He’s Got This

Over Easter, my youngest son came to visit.  Each time he visits me I am shocked by how much he has grown. My little boy is long gone and a young man is emerging. A child with diabetes is being replaced by a young person with diabetes and I stand in awe.

This time I stood back a bit more. I tried not to fall into old habits of taking over care or nagging about testing. I gently reminded. I compared carb counts now and again when asked.  I tested him at night at his request but mostly I sat and watched.

I wondered how his care was going. He hasn’t told me an A1c in years. I worried about his rates. I worried about his health.  The more I tested, the more I watched, the more my pride grew.

He wasn’t perfect.  He still doesn’t test as much as I would like but when he did test, his results were awesome. When he ate junk, which he doesn’t do as much any more, he nailed the bolus.  When he spiked because of a low cartridge and air being delivered instead of insulin, the spike was no longer in the 20s (360+) it hovered in the low teens.

I sat back and realized that he’s got this.  All of those years of preaching, teaching and sharing have paid off.  He is taking care of himself.  He is trying to protect his body from itself and doing a good job.

In a recent conversation I reminded him that he is the expert in his care.  It is his job to ensure that he is able to demonstrate that to medical professionals that he sees.  He should listen to them and be willing to accept their help but he may also have to remind them that he has been doing this all of his life.  He has been privileged to be trained by some of the very best people in diabetes care in the world.  He has a very good handle on things and a huge support network to reach out to when he is in doubt.

He explained that he finds that very frustrating.  He doesn’t want to get into a contest of who knows more when he sees someone but he feels that after all of these years he does know his body.  He is very healthy.  He has got this…and he has!

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Governments are a mess. Private insurance is too expensive.

Governments all over are in a mess.  Private insurance is out of reach for too many.  What is left?

Last week our province handed down its latest budget.  Earlier in the month, the federal government released its budget.  No matter where you look, governments are cutting back and taking programs away.  They are not interested in expanding coverage, sharing coverage or adding new coverage to their medical expenses.

We can tell them all about the cost savings that these programs will offer but all that they see is the outlay and staffing.  They don’t see the benefits.  It can be very frustrating.

As I was logging in to write this post, I happened to open an article on the funding of the Edmonton Protocol.  For over 16 years, this therapy has been available as a last resort for people with diabetes and guess what? Governments are thinking twice about funding it as well!

What are we to do? If governments are not going to be funding treatments that have been around for 16 years, what is going to happen when the artificial pancreas comes to market? Most provinces are not funding sensor augmented pumps at this point. The majority of provinces do not provide adults with any sort of financial assistance for pumps.   What can we do?

This is where my mind as been stewing. I don’t have a lot of answers but there must be one.  We need change.  Our adults living with diabetes need reasonable access to the latest diabetes technologies to keep them healthy and productive members of society. There has to be a way to help those who just cannot afford to carry the complete financial burden.

It would have to be a  private venture.   The public system is a mess no matter where you live.  It would have to be accessible to all– a system that is reflective of what you can afford.

Private insurance companies exist but they are often too  expensive.  Many private insurance policies (either purchased by individuals or by companies) do not cover enough diabetes supplies to last a person more than a few  months.  If they do cover more, they are often so expensive that only a few can afford them.

There has to be a way for private industry, pharmaceutical entities, and those in need to somehow all have their needs met.  There has to be a way to create something new that would be sustainable and yet help those who cannot afford to help themselves.  There has to be a way to bring together all of the players to create something that doesn’t see favoritism or a monopoly but rather a way to help everyone in need through the help of everyone involved.

And this is where my brain stalls and spins.  How would you fix the problem? How would you provide better access for diabetes supplies to everyone who needs them? Where would you turn? I really am curious…

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