Category Archives: bg humour

What’s Your Favorite Number?

I once pondered my favorite number. Here is that post…


Everyone always asks you “what is your favorite number?”  For whatever reason, mine has always been six.  Today I realized how much I truly love that number.

Last night I tested my son at 2:30am.  I had changed his basal rate was I was expecting him to be either in range or high.  I was figuring on the high because we only seem to have readings fall into one category or the other–high or low. I was happy to see that he was 6mmol (100) and headed back to bed with a smile on my face.

This morning I began to think about numbers.  A high (anything over 12 in my world) causes a groan–hormones are raging or we miscalculated a bolus and I am a bad pancreas. A higher high–something over 16 (290) causes a slightly larger reaction–CRAP! What is wrong? Did we forget a bolus? Is the site in? Is the insulin bad? Is there air in the tubing? Will this correction work or should I inject? Crap!

There is also the dreaded non-number.  You know, when the meter simply says “HI” and you know that its not being friendly and wanting to strike up a conversation.  That is the reading that instantly gets the “Oh SH!#” response followed by the injection, ketone meter, jug of water, new site, new insulin and a lot more cursing wondering where I went wrong. I am now a colossal failure as a pancreas and have to get serious FAST.

On the other side of the coin, we have the number 5. I hate a five at night (90 for my American friends).  A five is a number that is close to six but far enough away that it could easily turn into a four…or less.  A five keeps me awake at night. I wonder which way it will go.  Will it make it up to my beloved six or will it tank to an unwanted two?

Fours are much more simplistic.  Add a small amount of sugar.  Its too close to call so I assume we are heading to a low.  Add a tablet or a bit of chocolate milk and rest assured that a crisis has been averted.  Well don’t rest too soundly because I have been wrong before and he could still tank but its a start.

Threes are a two tiered panic.  The first three I see at night, I respond with “crap”! I have to be a bit awake and somehow get glucose into my child.  The second three (or worse) means I am wide awake and cursing the arrival of diabetes into our lives.  I then know that this will be a long night and I will be tortured by its memory long after he has climbed back up to my special number–six.

A two or one? Well they instantly put me in five star, full fledged, try not to panic, but What The…??? freak-out mode.  These numbers have me clambering for glucose and praying I don’t need the glucagon.  These numbers have me watching the clock praying for the next reading to be so much better.

Yes, six is a wonderful number. Its peaceful.  It means I have been a good pancreas.  It has a serene sense to it.  Even a 6 in an A1c is fabulous.  I love six…don’t you?

It was the stress

Last night we were sitting around in the living room enjoying a movie and a few laughs.  My son pulled out his meter to test. He was relatively high and began to scroll through his meter. He soon realized that besides tagging if the reading was before or after a meal, you could also say that you were ill, exercising or stressed.

He looked at me and said “I’m 16.9 (305). I think it was the stress that did it.”

“Stress?? We are watching a movie and you are sitting on the couch.  What stress? You have no stress.”

“No. I’m positive that I am high because of stress. Look right here. See below the reading? Its says “stress”.  The high must has occurred because of stress!” 

Ugh! Yes, this is what I have to deal with but it does not end there. This morning he woke up and again was running a little high.  He again told me that it was because of stress. I suggested it was because he didn’t change his site the night before. Again, he swore that it was stress.

I suggested that he needed to go outside and shovel out the backdoor which was snowed in.  He said that he couldn’t.  Snow makes him low and being stressed already he really shouldn’t do anything that would add further stress to his body. I reminded him that exercise was a great form of stress relief and it would also help to lower his high bg level. 

Unable to win this battle, he changed the site and then shoveled out our backdoor.

Teens and gadgets…they can be a dangerous combination for parents’ stress levels! I will however give him a A for creativity.