Category Archives: diabetes advocacy

How to Fight for the Disability Tax Credit with Type 1 Diabetes

How to fight for the DTC with T1DDiabetes Canada recently released a statement claiming that the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) is now declining 80% of applications for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) submitted by people living with type 1 diabetes.  I cannot confirm or deny these figures. I can state that I am seeing a significant increase in the number of people contacting. They are reaching out because they  or  their clients have been declined for the DTC.

What is going on with the DTC?

No one seems to know.  CRA claims that there has been no change in policy.  Public concern seems to suggest otherwise.

For years, people with diabetes have often received a follow-up letter when they have made their application asking for more details from their doctor.  In the past, that letter was filled out in a similar manner to the initial application and the claim was approved.  This seems to be happening with less frequency now.

People living with diabetes are often receiving a letter stating that “an adult who independently manages insulin therapy on a regular basis generally does not meet the 14 hours per week requirement unless there are exceptional circumstances.”.  In some cases this is followed by a request for more information but in other cases it is part of the denial for their claim.

Does this mean that I should not apply?

No.  People living with diabetes usually spend over 14 hours per week to intensively manage their diabetes.  Granted this does not include all people living with diabetes but does include a large majority.

You should continue to send in your detailed applications. Make sure that you are adding tasks that are approved and that your total is over 14 hours.

What happens after I apply for the DTC?

Once you and your doctor have completed your forms and returned your application, there will be some time before you hear back from CRA.

Odds are high that your doctor will be contacted and asked for more information.  Again, make sure that the follow up letter is detailed. Take care to  clearly show that you spend over 14 hours per week on your diabetes care.

What if I am rejected?

If you are turned down for the Disability Tax Credit, you have a few options.

First you can ask that your file be reassessed by another officer.  Sometimes fresh eyes will give a fresh perspective and the ruling can be changed.

Second, you can formally appeal their decision within the first 90 days of your rejection letter.  This is a detailed process but does not necessarily require a lawyer.  If you choose to go this route (and I would encourage everyone to do so), be sure to keep careful and detailed records. You must also contact CRA for a copy of your file under the Access to Information Act to better understand what you are fighting against.

Write your Member of Parliament

Finally, at any stage of the process, I would encourage you to ask for the assistance of your MP.  Whether you are thinking of applying, have applied or have been rejected, it is important for Members of Parliament to be aware of this situation.  Diabetes Canada has written a great template for people to send to their MP.  Download the letter. Be sure to personalize it to your situation and forward it on.  Remember that letters sent to a Member of Parliament in Ottawa do not require postage.

The more MPs that contact the Finance Department and ask them what is going on, the stronger the case for change and fairness.

Together we were able to get access to this credit for some people living with diabetes over 10 years ago.  Working together again, we will create change for even more individuals!

Which Liberal Government?

The summer is over and it’s now time to get back to work.

This summer I saw a number of variations of this status posted all over Facebook…

“I would like to highlight the Liberal government removing the subsidy for blood test strips. Diabetics need very frequent blood testing, up to 5+ times a day. The cost of strips is $70.00 – outcome – reduced blood glucose testing and more hospital admissions from hyper or hypo glycemic episodes.
Diabetes . . . I am asking if everyone could put this as their status for 1 hour. I’m pretty sure I know the ones that will. Think of someone you know or love who has or has had diabetes. My hope is that in 2016 a cure will be found. Will you post it for 1 hour? To honor those who have fought or are fighting diabetes.? “

Many people were sharing this status.  Many more were asking…where is this from? Whose government is doing this? The answers were surprising.

liberalsI was certain that it was Newfoundland.  This spring the new Liberal government  announced changes to the provincial prescription drug plan.  They were limiting the number of test strips to 2500 annually for those using MDI, 700 for those using just a long acting insulin, 100 for those not using insulin and 50 for those who have only recently been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.*

As this post continued to make its rounds however, I was shocked to see that a number of other locations were also claiming that this was a reality in their home area. People from as far away as Australia were saying that this had happened to them.  They said it was their government that the post was directed at.  All I could think was, “this is crazy!”

For years, study after study has shown how important tight control and home blood glucose monitoring is.  They have shown that good control equates to improved health outcomes AND immediate financial benefit in terms of reduced loss of work. Why would governments think that they were saving money by cutting access to blood glucose testing strips?

This entire scenario hits too close to home as my son turns 19. He may soon be in a position of losing his health care coverage.  His days of being covered by his father’s private health care plan are numbered.   My stomach aches each time I think of this safety net being taken away.  He does have some coverage from the province.  We will find a way but what about other children?

I don’t mean small children, I mean adults who are struggling to find their way.  What about them? What about their families? How do they cope? How do you work a minimum wage job, pay your rent, buy your groceries AND cover your diabetes care costs?

Again, we know how important blood glucose testing is. As parents, we have spent years asking  our children “Did you test?” and “What was your blood glucose reading?”  How do they answer those questions when they can’t afford the test strips? How accurate will their guess have to be?

Without proper testing, they cannot accurately dose their insulin. They cannot make exact judgement calls on corrections.  They will run a high risk of complications.  They most likely will have more sick days.  This will cost governments more money in lost tax revenue and create an increased drain on hospital services.

If a person with diabetes is unable to test and stop potentially dangerous high blood glucose levels on their own, they will be forced to seek hospital treatments.  A 2008 report in the Toronto Star suggests that one typical hospital stay then cost approximately $7000**.  $7000…you can get 100 strips for $80-$100.  If you test 8-10 times per day that one hospital stay would still  cost more than 2 years worth of test strips. Two years. 

It would appear that the people in charge of making these policy changes need to better understand what they have done.  Basic math shows the folly in such policies. We can only hope that public pressure and common sense will ultimately prevail.  Our loved ones with diabetes need access to the proper medical supplies to ensure that they can continue to be healthy, productive members of our societies.

*http://www.thetelegram.com/News/Local/2016-04-17/article-4500650/Changes-coming-to-provincial-drug-program/1

**https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2008/03/18/average_hospital_stay_costs_nearly_7000_study.html

 

Governments are a mess. Private insurance is too expensive.

Governments all over are in a mess.  Private insurance is out of reach for too many.  What is left?

Last week our province handed down its latest budget.  Earlier in the month, the federal government released its budget.  No matter where you look, governments are cutting back and taking programs away.  They are not interested in expanding coverage, sharing coverage or adding new coverage to their medical expenses.

We can tell them all about the cost savings that these programs will offer but all that they see is the outlay and staffing.  They don’t see the benefits.  It can be very frustrating.

As I was logging in to write this post, I happened to open an article on the funding of the Edmonton Protocol.  For over 16 years, this therapy has been available as a last resort for people with diabetes and guess what? Governments are thinking twice about funding it as well!

What are we to do? If governments are not going to be funding treatments that have been around for 16 years, what is going to happen when the artificial pancreas comes to market? Most provinces are not funding sensor augmented pumps at this point. The majority of provinces do not provide adults with any sort of financial assistance for pumps.   What can we do?

This is where my mind as been stewing. I don’t have a lot of answers but there must be one.  We need change.  Our adults living with diabetes need reasonable access to the latest diabetes technologies to keep them healthy and productive members of society. There has to be a way to help those who just cannot afford to carry the complete financial burden.

It would have to be a  private venture.   The public system is a mess no matter where you live.  It would have to be accessible to all– a system that is reflective of what you can afford.

Private insurance companies exist but they are often too  expensive.  Many private insurance policies (either purchased by individuals or by companies) do not cover enough diabetes supplies to last a person more than a few  months.  If they do cover more, they are often so expensive that only a few can afford them.

There has to be a way for private industry, pharmaceutical entities, and those in need to somehow all have their needs met.  There has to be a way to create something new that would be sustainable and yet help those who cannot afford to help themselves.  There has to be a way to bring together all of the players to create something that doesn’t see favoritism or a monopoly but rather a way to help everyone in need through the help of everyone involved.

And this is where my brain stalls and spins.  How would you fix the problem? How would you provide better access for diabetes supplies to everyone who needs them? Where would you turn? I really am curious…

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Lace up For Diabetes

#LaceUp4Diabetes  Have you heard of it?  I admit that I hadn’t.  What I had heard of was a friend on Facebook who was giving away these adorable shoe laces.

I commented on how cute they were.  He offered to send me a pair. Unfortunately because we were living in two separate countries, the hassle of mailing them was a bit much.  He did however pass along to his contact that I was interested in the laces.  This was the result…

#LaceUp4Diabetes
#LaceUp4Diabetes

Thirty pairs of shoes laces with the World Diabetes Circle on them!

It was a wonderful surprise.  I had only expected one pair.

These cute novelty items are the work of Novo Nordisk in an effort to offer support for those living with and at risk for, diabetes.  They write “Because if we all take these steps together, we can change diabetes.”  So very true!  Whether we work together towards a cure, to offer support, or to change legislation, one voice united is so much stronger.

Summit Diabetes

Earlier this summer, I received an email from a young lady who was embarking on an adventure that looked really interesting. I meant to take a much closer look sooner but the email came in while I was away and then managed to get lost in my inbox.  Today I decided to seek it out again and see what she was up to.


The young lady’s name is Haley Maurice.  She is now 15 and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 7.  Her plan for this summer was adventurous for any teen but even more exceptional when you remember that she is living with type 1 diabetes.


“On July 16th, my brother Ethan and I will be backpacking 221 miles from Yosemite National Park to the top of the highest peak in the continental United States, Mt. Whitney, to raise funds for JDRF.


We’ll be trekking in this high alpine terrain for an estimated three weeks, conquering over 46,000 ft of elevation gain and venturing deep into the back country of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. It’ll be just us out there, with only two resupply points along the way to pick up more diabetic supplies and food to fuel us for the entire duration of the hike. We’ve been vigorously training and setting up our fundraiser for the past three months and are aspiring to reach our fundraising goal of $1000 per mile ($221,000) for JDRF.”


A few days ago, I hiked a 1.7km trail that has a 500 ft decent.  That was enough of a challenge for me.  I can’t begin to imagine 221 miles and 46,000 feet with blood glucose testing, site changes, insulin adjustments, treating lows, and carrying food and shelter.  I further was not sure how I would feel if it was my child with diabetes doing this.


Silly, of course I know how I would feel. I would be nervous and proud.  I would be terrified of all that could go wrong but would trust in the other sibling to help out in emergencies. I would be proud that my child would take on such an amazing adventure for a good cause.  I am guessing that Haley and Ethan’s parents probably felt much the same way.


In looking at the Summit Diabetes website and exploring some of their social media posts, I see that the two siblings were for the most part successful in their journey. Yesterday they noted…

“We made it!!! 221 miles of hiking from Yosemite to Mount Whitney!


Unfortunately, we didn’t make the top of Whitney as a freak snowstorm nearly froze us to death this morning just a quarter mile from the top.”


What an amazing feat! I am so impressed by these young people. I am impressed by their courage, dedication and stamina.  When Haley contacted me, she was asking for only one thing, for me to share her story and that is what I hope to do here.  Please look at their video, check out their website and the amazing pictures of their adventure.  If you can, also contribute to their goal of raising $1000 for every one mile that they hiked this summer.


Congratulations Haley and Ethan!

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Age Shouldn’t Matter

Last week, during blog week, I told you about things that get my dander up and make me want to scream from the roof tops until they are fixed. One of those things was access to insulin pumps and supplies. Since the day that I realized that there were more options available to my son than the insulin regimen we were currently on, I was adamant that all people with diabetes should have choice in their treatment options.

People living with diabetes should be able to decide if they want to use Lantus over NPH. They should be able to choose Apirdra over regular insulin.  They should be able to see if a Continuous Glucose Monitor or an insulin pump is for them without having to sell their home. That sounds extreme doesn’t it? Sadly it isn’t.  Despite living in Canada with its socialized medicine, Canadians are still not always able to access the best treatment options for them.  They may not have private health insurance or their insurance may not cover the devices that they desire to use.  The result is that they go without or go to extreme measures to get the medical tools that they desire to keep them healthy. For me, that is not acceptable.

My son began using an insulin pump 11 years ago.  I had wanted a pump for him since the first time I heard of the flexibility that it allowed but financially it was not an option.  His father had medical insurance but insulin pumps were not covered. What changed 11 years ago? My family stepped in and said that they would come together to pay for the pump.  They wanted the very best for my son.  It is a moment that I will never forget.

Over time things have changed thankfully. Provinces have begun to cover insulin pumps–for children.  Those over 18 have had to find good insurance, high paying jobs, go back to injections out of necessity rather than choice or move to Ontario (the first province to cover all people with Type 1 diabetes who wished to use insulin pump therapy).  In my own province of Newfoundland and Labrador, changes have been made as well, the age limit for assistance was moved to 25.

Today my son is 16.  He is heading into his final year of high school and looking at career options. The most important part of his career choice is to find one that is either very high paying or offers great benefits. What he enjoys seems to be second on our list. That is discouraging and gets my dander up.

If a person wishes to use an insulin pump to best control their diabetes care, then they should have that option.  Age, financial status, or occupation should not dictate what type of therapy they can receive.  With this in mind, advocates in provinces like British Columbia have created petitions to ask their government to expand coverage and remove age restrictions. Pensioners are having to go back to injections because their private health care coverage ends at retirement.  Young adults who are beginning careers and new families are having to rethink how they will move forward because of cost constraints brought on by managing their diabetes care
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This is not right.  Age should not dictate whether you get an insulin pump or not.  Insulin pumps provide just as many benefits to adults as it does to children.  Adults with type 1 diabetes who are using insulin pumps often find shift work much more manageable.  They tend to see less diabetes related down time because they can micro manage their disease with greater ease.  The addition of Continuous Glucose Monitoring systems to their care can help them to anticipate dangerous highs or lows that could have otherwise sent them home for the day.  Increased productivity and work time for people with diabetes has a larger impact on society as well. People living with diabetes who are able to work are able to contribute to the provincial tax coffers through their employable earnings.  They are less likely to have complications or dangerous blood glucose swings that could send them to the hospital.  Our young people with diabetes are able to look at jobs in the province rather than having to move to areas with better pay and better benefits.

The rewards definitely outweigh the costs to the provincial governments and our health care systems. With this in mind, I have created a petition that will ultimately be presented to the government of Newfoundland and Labrador asking that they expand their insulin pump program.

Please consider signing and sharing this petition.  The more voices we have, the stronger we are.  This is a very serious and real issue.  The stories and needs behind the petition are heart breaking.  I have spoken to a government employee who have had to rent out her homes so that she can have extra money to be able to afford her diabetes supplies.  I have listened to medical personnel who have had to rely on financial help from a life partner in order to continue pumping.  I have sat down with members of the police services who pay the equivalent of an extra car payment each month just to keep themselves pumping and healthy.  There are also people who are in minimum wage jobs who have no choice but return to injections after they turn 25 because they just can’t afford to pay for their rent and their insulin pump.

This needs to change. With your help it will. Please support this initiative for all of those who choose to use an insulin pump.
NL pump petition

The Bad Kind

The other day, I sat down to begin reading Ginger Vieira’s new book “Dealing with Diabetes Burn-out“.  I had only read the introduction when I wanted to cry.  Why is there so much judgement surrounding diabetes? Why do people living with diabetes feel that they are either good or bad? Well, as Ginger points out, its because there is so much good and bad mentioned when talking about the disease.

Your readings are good or bad.  They are not the result of a carb counting error or a pending illness that you cannot foresee. They are a good reading or a bad one.  The food you eat is either good food or its bad and a diabetic shouldn’t eat it.  Your A1c when you see the doctor is either good or bad.

The constant judgement does not end there. I was listening to a conversation a few weeks ago and quietly cringed as I heard someone mention that a person had diabetes “really bad”.  Another person had mentioned that someone had died because they had the “bad kind of diabetes”.  I wanted to say that there is no good kind!  You can only hope and pray that a person with diabetes has all of the knowledge, supports and tools that they need to care for themselves in the best possible way.  It wasn’t my place to educate at that time.

The good kind I assume, is the kind that is managed by diet and exercise  but is it really that good? You still have to live with guilt for each piece of food that enters your mouth.  You must be constantly wondering when that bullet will hit its target and you will get the dreaded sentence–”You have the bad kind of diabetes”.

What is the “bad kind of diabetes”? Is it when you have to have needles? Is it when you are on pills? Is it when you are overweight? Is it when you are two and don’t know why you have to be stabbed and poked at all of the time? Is it when you have to be hooked up to a machine 24/7? When does it become “bad”?

Personally, it is always bad.  In all of those cases, our bodies have rebelled against us and are not working as they should.  We have to fight and struggle to compensate. Using insulin actually can make it easier not worse. Modern insulins allow people with diabetes to be able to match insulin to food amounts in a way that their body, without insulin, can’t.  That’s not such a bad thing. It allows them to have that piece of chocolate cake without concern of a crazy high a few hours later.

This distinction between “good and bad” actually has a negative impact on treatment as well. While insulin injections or insulin pumps are not an option for a person living with Type 1 diabetes, it is often seen as a last resort for a person with Type 2 diabetes.  Sadly this is not the case.  Studies have shown that giving a person with Type 2 diabetes insulin earlier can actually preserve some of their beta cell functioning and make their lives a little easier.  Unfortunately, that “good and bad”  issue stops that from happening. People fear that they will be “bad” if they are on insulin.  This further translates to the thought that  those who live with Type 1 diabetes and need an external source of insulin to keep them alive must have it “really bad”.

I thought about other diseases and wondered if any others have it “bad”.  Cancer has stages.  Diseases like MS are referred to has having “full blown MS” versus the early stages.  I could not think of any other disease that allows people to have the “good kind” or the “bad kind”.  Is it the lifestyle component but if it is why do we not hold that same standard for other “life style” related diseases? Is it because in the other diseases they understand that lifestyle is only a small component? People will say that Type 1 diabetes is NOT a lifestyle related disease but that does not stop the public from blaming the lifestyle of the mother of a person with diabetes.  We are blamed for things like not breastfeeding long enough and other equally ridiculous notions.

What is the answer? How do we fix this? I don’t think that there is a quick fix.  I think that we continue as we have been. We educate people who ask us if we have the “bad kind of diabetes”.  We work with the media when they try to get it right. We are kind but firm with those people who are ignorant of the facts because we may have once been ignorant as well. Finally, we find a cure so that no one ever again has to be judged because their body has failed them.
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Four Hours, Just Four Hours

Diabetes Blog WeekYesterday we opened up about how diabetes can bring us down. Today let’s share what gets us through a hard day.  Or more specifically, a hard diabetes day.  Is there something positive you tell yourself?  Are there mantras that you fall back on to get you through?  Is there something specific you do when your mood needs a boost?  Maybe we’ve done that and we can help others do it too? (Thanks to Meri of Our Diabetic Life for suggesting this topic.)

Is there a mantra that I fall back on to get me through a hard diabetes day? Absolutely! It is one that I share with newly diagnosed adults and parents who are struggling to get through. I remind them to look at life in four-hour blocks. If you take everything in four-hour strides and you can ride through anything.

When diabetes seems to be kicking your butt every morning, look at how things are going between lunch and supper. Are things okay? Give yourself a mental high-five and celebrate that victory rather than dwelling on the post-breakfast spike that this threatening to drive you over the edge.

Do overnights seem overwhelming? Again, break it down.  How are things from snack until 12 or 1am? What is life like in the deepest part of the night? Are things settled before breakfast or has chaos been awakened in those four hours? If you break it down into six four-hour periods, life becomes a bit more manageable and instead of seeing all of the bad, you can savor some of the good.

Why do I have a four-hour mantra? Because early on I learned that my son’s Humalog was supposed to last about 4 hours.  He was injected at 8am for breakfast, then at noon for lunch, around 5pm for supper and then again at 9pm for his nighttime snack.  I was going crazy trying to see a perfect 24 hour day. I realized that looking at a complete day was never going to make me happy. The only way to see success was to look at small chunks of time.  Coincidentally, that was also how we would make changes to his regimen.  Was his breakfast ratio of carbs to insulin off? How about at bedtime? Life was naturally being broken down into 4 hour chunks for me so why not work with that?

Now I know some of you will say, but we are using a pump so that won’t work for me.  Yes it will!  Chances are high that you are still doing things like having breakfast, lunch and supper.  You are probably still going to bed at one point as well. All of these events can be broken down and again my four-hour mantra applied.  Was I a successful pancreas this afternoon? Yes? AWESOME!! Let’s break out the happy dance!!! Did I have an issue after supper? Okay, let’s look at what can be done.

Life is less overwhelming in four-hour shots. It can be applied it outside of diabetes as well.  Are you wanting to change your eating habits? Did you have a great breakfast? Pat yourself on the back. Over did it at lunch? Do better tomorrow. Can you see how easily this works?

Life can be overwhelming.  As we discussed yesterday, life with diabetes can make it worse.  Taking life four hours at a time has allowed me to focus on what I need to change and to praise myself when I get it right…and we all need a lot more praise in our lives.
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Ode to a Needle

Diabetes Blog Week 
Day two of this year’s blog week asks that we create poetry. I have not done poetry since high school and sadly that was not yesterday.  I therefore cheated and enlisted the help of my children.
This is what we came up with…
syringeNeedles are wonderful
Needles are fine
They poke and jab and and puncture me,
But keep me alive.

Some folks thinks needles are scary;
With that I must agree
But the needles that I must use
Allow me to continue to laugh, and play and be this awesome person–me!

By Liam and Barb…and don’t worry folks, we will not be taking up poetry as a full-time thing

Three Things that Raise My Dander

Diabetes Blog Week
Its Diabetes Blog week once again and I am so excited to be able to participate once again!  Today’s topic comes for Kim of Texting my Pancreas and asks us to discuss diabetes issues that get us really fired up!

Since I began my website many years ago, the issues that I have been passionate about have grown but have always retained one common thread–improving the lives of people living with diabetes.  There have been some successes and there is still a long way to go but watching the diabetes community come together and create change has been the best part of the journey.

The first issue that got my dander up was the inequity I saw years ago in the way people with diabetes were treated when it came to the Disability Tax Credit.  As I worked on this issue, I saw that those who were approved for the credit were people who were able to stand up to the government and were willing to fight for this issue. If you were uncertain or did not know how to take on this battle, you would be denied the credit while your neighbor was approved.  There seemed to be no other logic behind how this credit was applied to people living with diabetes.
With a lot of help from other people living with diabetes and a fabulous mentor, I was able to see this issue change dramatically. Fairness was obtained and change happened to the legislation surrounding this issue. I was very proud of all the works that was done here but there were still more issues to tackle.

As I learned about diabetes and became more involved in the world of advocacy, I came to realize how difficult it was to get an insulin pump if you didn’t have the very best insurance coverage.  Once again I was outraged.  Why should it matter what sort of job you have or where you work to get the best possible care for your diabetes?

Since I first began dealing with this issue, things have changed.  Most provinces in Canada now offer provincial health care coverage for insulin pumps and supplies for all children under the age of 18.  That was great but what about older children who are just starting out in the workforce? Some provinces decided to give these young adults until age 25 to get better insurance…some provinces didn’t.  Today, I continue to work with others to see that all people living with diabetes have access to the best devices available to manage their diabetes care regardless of age. This means that I would like all governments to cover insulin pumps, supplies and Continuous Glucose Monitors for people with diabetes regardless of age.  This will happen in time. I am confident.

No matter what your age or where you live, you deserve access to the very best in medical care.  It is important for governments (and insurance companies) to understand the broad sweeping benefits that come from best care practices. If a person with diabetes is able to maintain their bg control to a close to normal range and they are able to anticipate highs and lows with the aid of CGM technology they are better able to perform at work (which means less down time and more money paid to the government in terms of personal tax), they are less likely to be in the hospital (costing the government money), and more likely to have a better overall life satisfaction which in turn further leads to increased productivity and once again an increase in taxes paid to governments. The cost outlay is far outweighed by the benefits to the system as a whole.

At the moment, I live in a province that covers insulin pumps for people with Type 1 diabetes until they reach the age of 25. It does not cover CGM technology.  I have less than 9 years to advocate for increased funding to cover all people with diabetes regardless of age.  In 9 years my own son will be in the position of having to make very serious and real choices about his diabetes care. We will see this change–for him and for all of the other adults struggling to maintain their health despite the heavy financial costs.

Because my son is still in school and has had diabetes since before he went to school, the third issue that I am passionate about is that of children with diabetes in schools. This issue has seen major changes since I first began talking about it over 10 years ago.  In BC, we have seen the power of grassroots parent organizations who have pressured the government into changing its policy on children with diabetes in schools.  I have seen many more individual boards and provinces begin to seriously look at the issue of protecting the rights of children with diabetes in schools.

Once again, this is an issue that many parents and children are not able to stand up and voice their concerns about themselves. I felt that it was therefore my job to help them.  I would (and do) speak to parents on how best to tackle their schools and their issues. I work with boards to help them understand what needs to be done to create change that is fair and just to all parties involved. This is a very complex issue here in Canada. Our children are not protected by a disabilities act. They are protected by the voices of their parents and other concerned adults…but these voices are powerful and making a difference.

Advocacy has always been something that I am very passionate about. I have felt a strong need to stand up for those who may not be able to stand up for themselves.  I have worked for the past 14 years to ensure that people living with diabetes are all treated fairly with equal access to education, medical devices and supplies.  This is a long road.  It has seen many battles won and I am proud to be able to continue fighting the war along side many incredible people.

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