Category Archives: Diabetes blog week

Tips and Tricks…day 5 of Diabetes Blog Week

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Oh my goodness, today’s prompt is seriously probably the hardest of the week.  Share you best diabetes tips and tricks. Do I have any? We put one foot in front of the other hand hope for the best. Does that count?

Okay, tips and tricks…well, the first trick I learned was when my son was first diagnosed.  We didn’t have Rufus the bear with diabetes but I knew that my toddler needed to feel that he was not alone. The way I did that was to give Elmo diabetes as well.  He had a stuffed Elmo that somehow made its way to the hospital with us.  As I was learning to inject a doll, I have my two year old a needle and supervised him giving Elmo injections.

Writing that sounds crazy. I gave a 2 year old a needle? I did. It was a pen needle and the tip wasn’t in it but I gave him the pen filled with insulin and let him pretend to give his stuffed toy an injection.  He was making his friend feel better just like I was helping to make him feel better.  It worked for us!

As he aged, new issues came up and bribery was introduced.  Okay, we didn’t use the term “bribery”, we referred to it as rewards.  If he ate his breakfast without a fuss, he received a sticker.  After a certain number of stickers a reward was earned.  It worked for a bit.

What tips did we use for storing supplies? Well for us storing diabetes supplies was relatively simple…totes.  We have totes on wheels and when they were too full, we also had totes that went under the bed.  This allowed us to have a large supply of glucometers and pump supplies for times when insurance coverage was not available. My son still has both the cart and the tote.

Finally our rule for travel is simple…always pack twice what you think that you will need and then throw in a little more!  Whenever my son travels, he seems to experience a lot more highs than normal.  We do more site changes.  We bring more supplies.

I have also learned to store insulin in more than one place when you leave home.  We traveled across Canada once many years ago.  All of the insulin was in the cooler.  The cooler was somehow put on the heater setting.  All of the insulin was at risk of being spoiled. I never did that again. Insulin is now scattered among bags for safe keeping.

The final trick we have used is all my son.  When your sites are starting to peel up but the insulin is still flowing, you don’t want to make a change and your readings are still good–use duct tape! We have medical tape.  We have opt-sites.  My son uses duct tape to hold his sites in place.  Yes, they do make a mess of your skin after but they do hold your site in! –You may be a diabetes redneck when??

The Mental Part of Diabetes…Day 2 of Dblog Week

730x1207[5]The mental part of diabetes is huge.  It is  the  part that the average person  really doesn’t understand. It’s the part that scares me the most.

Everything that a person with diabetes does requires thought. Every action requires planning.  Getting up involves testing blood glucose levels to see if you can pee or if you need to have insulin or food before your first trip to the washroom.

Eating food requires a math lesson–how many carbohydrates are in whatever you/your loved one plans to eat.  Now, how much of that is fiber? Okay, how much fat or protein is in the meal? What is the anticipated activity level for the next four hours? What was the blood glucose reading before sitting down to this meal? When was the last time that insulin was taken? Is there still some insulin floating around in the body that has to be taken into account? What time of day is it? How much insulin to you normally use at this time of day to cover a pre-established amount of carbohydrates? Is there any illness or stress that is impacting blood glucose levels at the moment? After all of these questions have been answered, the totals added, subtracted, and divided, an insulin dose may be given…and you pray you go this one right.

This procedure is repeated every time a person with diabetes wants to eat anything that has any nutritious value…every time.

Going for a long walk or working out is just as an intense of a process.  A person with diabetes must make sure that they have their supplies handy.  Do they have enough glucose if they feel themselves dropping? Have they taken just enough insulin to avoid a high but not enough to cause a low when physical? Have the changed their insulin delivery for the next ____ amount of time to deal with the post-exercise drop and the adrenaline during the event? Do they have enough test strips?

That brings us to simply walking out the door.  People tease me about my purse. It’s a suitcase.  Even though my son with diabetes no longer lives with me, I still tend to carry a massive purse. Once upon a time it had to carry glucose tablets, juice boxes, crackers, test strips, needles, alcohol swabs, hand sanitizer, and medical tape to name just a few items. No matter where my son goes, he has to bring his insulin pump, meter, test strips and glucose. His pockets are never empty.

Imagine the burden of having to remember all of this “stuff”.  Imagine the burden of having to remember to test, to bolus or inject every time you want to eat or nibble at something.  Imagine the stress of having to worry how a meal will impact your blood glucose levels. Imagine having to worry about how that exercise will impact your body while you sleep. Imagine having to worry about going low while you drive.  Imagine having to worry about how that beer will impact your readings later on this evening.  Imagine simply being afraid to go to sleep because you might not wake up.

Everything around diabetes requires thought.  I worry about the toll that that can have on those living with diabetes like my son.

As a parent of a person with diabetes, how do I survive? It has its own challenges.  When my son was small and for all of the years that he lived at home with me, I survived four hours at a time.  I realized that I could only control four hours–the amount of time that his fast acting insulin was supposed to be working. If my son was in range from  7-11am, I would be happy.  I would put the potential  high at 2pm out of my mind. For that moment, I would bask in the glory of getting it right for 4 hours.

Later, I would move on to the next time slot.  Four hours is a relatively small period of time but in the world of diabetes, it can be forever and celebrating getting it right is a wonderful thing.

My son doesn’t live with me at the moment.  That has changed my role dramatically.  At first I was stressed out completely.  He doesn’t look after himself the same way that I do.  Would he test at night? Would he stay up or set an alarm to re-test? How would he handle it when he needed to make changes? How would he manage going to appointments? How would he handle stress? How would he manage alcohol or girls? I was too far away to monitor and he quickly pushed me further to the fringes.

As I was pushed away, I learned that this was his disease.  He had to find his way. I was there when he had a question. I was there to encourage. I am still there to remind him of what he does know.  I am there to watch him learn from a distance.  It is hard. It is also very freeing and that leads to a lot of guilt.  I can now turn off diabetes in a way. I don’t think about it 24/7 but he can’t and I can’t change that.

I worry about him.  He has been dealing with diabetes for his entire life.  He has no memory of life  before needles and testing.  He is quiet. He doesn’t discuss diabetes with people. I fear he will burnout. When he is with me, I help with some of his care. I allow him to choose how much help he wants.

So how do you handle the mental side of diabetes? First, four hours at a time.  Don’t overwhelm yourself with the entire day, just look at the next four hours.

Second, ask for help.  Whether you are the primary caregiver or the person with diabetes, ask for help, accept help.  You need a break. Life with diabetes is not natural. It is stressful and crazy.  Take a break by handing the reins over to someone else if only for a task or two.  They won’t mind and you will be able to breathe.

 

Diabetes Blog Week Memories

How did it happen? Diabetes Blog Week is coming to an end already. I admit that it has been a huge challenge to take part this year.  It happened to fall on the week of my stepson’s wedding.  This meant that while I did my very best to have posts ready to go a bit ahead of time, I really didn’t get the chance to read as many posts as I wanted. I plan to make up for that next week!

I am not sure how many of the past six years of Blog Weeks that I have participated but I have to thank Karen so much for doing this! Each year I find the topics intriguing and find more and more people to follow and read.

As I said, I still have many more posts to read (and I do plan to read a lot more and continue reading them long after this week has ended). Of the ones that I have read, a few have struck me for different reasons.  Thank you to Arden’s Day for opening your blog to guest bloggers.  I have enjoyed Scott’s posts and of course loved his book but his post from Kelly Griffin really touched me.  My son is very private about his diabetes care and her words gave me a better understanding of him.

I absolutely loved reading Rick Phillips post called Wearing your Pants Backwards.  This quirky view on life in general was perfect and fits very much with the attitude of myself and my children.

The absolute, without a doubt best, more inspirational and moving post that I read this week had to be from Life on T1.  Alanna’s open and honest post struck me and brought tears to my eyes on so many levels.  I have heard many wonderful things about Alanna in the past but when this post came up in my news feed…well do yourself a favor and read it especially if you are a woman. Heck, if you are a person, you should read Alanna’s Clean Out.

Of course, Diabetes Blog Week also gave me a chance to catch up on the writing of old favorites like Mike from the Corner Booth. Whether posting on his own blog or writing for Diabetes Mine, Mike’s writings are always great to read.

Thank you to everyone who stopped by this week to read and leave comments. I appreciate your kind words and I look forward to keeping up with many more of you in the coming year!thank-you

My Favourite Blog Post?

 

Today’s Diabetes Blog Week prompt asks for my favourite of those that I have written.  Seriously? That is a challenge!! First, I don’t write thinking,” Wow, I am awesome!”  I used to write thinking that no one would ever read what I had to say.

As I realized that they did, I just wanted to post things so that other parents would know that they were not alone. I tried to find humour in some of those events.

I have written posts that have come from my own struggles and guilt as a parent of a child with diabetes.  The post written after my son told me that he wanted to move back with his father for his final two years of high school was definitely one of the hardest to write. Trying to find a balance of honestly, emotion and not sounding as lost as I felt was a huge challenge. The positive comments made me feel better for sharing.

I have tackled topics that many of us want to ignore like Dead in Bed but lately I have tried to educate through posts like my most recent Dear John and Jane Public and looking at the cost of diabetes care if it were me and not my son with the disease.

What is my absolute favourite? What makes me smile? Any post that shows my son’s great attitude and quirky sense of humour.  There have been many comments over the years that have come out of nowhere. Some of them I have caught and  published like when he told me…”“You know Mom, if I had to explain to someone what it felt like to be high or low all I would have to do is tell them to watch Suzie and Sweedums eat breakfast.  Suzie is what its like to be low and Sweedums is what its like to be high.” Suzie will  demolish a bowl of food before I have put food in Sweedums’ bowl.  Sweedums will eat one piece of food at a time, analyzing it and taking over to a mat to eat every single morsel.

The one post that will make me smile every time is when I described my son’s logic when it came to site changes. He was a day late doing his site change.  I was leaving him to it when he stopped me asking me why I was leaving?  When I told him that he was more than capable of doing a site change he replied…

“Yes, but Mom, you realize that you only have four more years to do site changes for me. I will turn 18 and move on and you will never have this opportunity again.  You should be savouring these times just like you say how important it is to share each birthday with me before I leave home. Actually, think of these site changes as being just like my birthday but every three days.  Treasure them. In fact, we can make it like my birthday if you want. You can even buy me presents for each site change done!”

Ironically, he is right about me missing it that is. I still get to do site changes when he visits. I don’t miss diabetes or harping on him to do a site change but since it is a part of him and I miss him, well I do kind of treasure those times when I did do his changes.

 

The post just once again showed his unique perspective that some days makes me want to bang my head against a wall but most days makes me smile and proudly say “Yes, that is my son!”Celebrate

 

 

Going to School with Diabetes Has Changed

Today’s prompt for Diabetes Blog Week asks what changes we have seen since diagnosis.

In the past 15+ years, we have seen a lot of changes.  We have seen 5 second glucometer results instead of 30 torturous seconds. We have seen long acting insulin, smart pumps and now sensor augmented pumps.  We have seen Continuous Glucose Monitors go from blinded instruments that you could only get from the hospital to tools that you can wear every day to watch real time trends!

One of the biggest changes that I have seen since my son was diagnosed with diabetes however is how provinces, school boards, and schools are now dealing with children with diabetes here in Canada.

I first began dealing with this issue when my son was 3.  He still had a year to go before he would enter the school system, but the school knew about my knowledge of diabetes care.  They wanted a heads  up on what to expect when a recently diagnosed student returned to school.  Together we were able to explore the roles and needs of both staff and student.

I spent time looking at what was being done in other provinces and other schools.  The results shocked me.  With the exception of New Brunswick, most areas had little to no policies for children with diabetes in schools.  The only thing that they tended to note was whether or not (and usually it was not), they would administer insulin in school and where the insulin was to be kept.

At first I was shocked. Diabetes was not a new disease.  How could it not be dealt with in the school system? Easily…in previous years multiple daily injections, home blood glucose monitoring and insulin pumps were not the norm in diabetes care.  Times were changing and school policies needed to change as well…and they have.

In 2015 provinces such as Newfoundland and Quebec now also have provincial policies in place.  Provinces such as British Columbia are working with their nursing staff to see better protection in place.  In other provinces, people are still working to find something that works for all parties.

The big difference is that today, provinces and parents are talking. Today, school boards are contacting myself, the Canadian Diabetes Association, and parents of children with diabetes to ask what our children’s needs are. There is a willingness to learn and a willingness to create change.

This does not mean that the problem of care for children with diabetes in Canada is solved. It does not mean that parents have no concerns when they send their children with diabetes to schools.  It means that in more places, there are less concerns. It means that in more schools there is already education and policy in place. That is a wonderful thing.  It shows that over time things can change for the better. I am positive that the next 15 years will see many more leaps and bounds for our children with diabetes as they return to school.

diabetes in school
Heading to school with diabetes can be stressful

Swept away and retired to a desk

Today’s prompt for Diabetes Blog Week asks what is that one thing that we are still clinging on to that we need to let go? What in our diabetes closet needs to be cleaned out?

Honestly, I was going to use a wildcard for this one. I thought it didn’t apply to me any longer.  Diabetes does not live with my full time any more so what could I possibly need to junk out? We cleaned out most of my son’s diabetes supplies when he moved.  Anything left here he needs when he visits. Obviously this was a topic that I was going to have to give a miss. Or maybe not….

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Sweeping out the old

There is something that I have been working on for…cough, cough, almost….two…cough…years.  It is something that I need to let go of, clean out, sweep away. My challenge is to sweep away that need to know all and me hands on 100% of the time.  It is now physically impossible and thinking otherwise is emotionally draining.

I have to adjust to the role of no longer being that person in charge. Learning my new role as the person standing in the office listening to what is going on in the trenches but removed from the actual events is a huge challenge.

I no longer have to wake up at various times during the night to test my son. That has its own guilt.  I still wake up through the night out of habit but as time has gone on, I no longer wake in a panic wondering if he is okay and if he is testing.

I have gotten better at having him text me readings.  Originally I wanted to know every reading.  I would stay up to all hours just so that we could talk and he could tell me what his readings had been like.  That didn’t work. He did his best to be busy when I wanted to call and talk.  I had to get rid of that need to know. I had to learn that it was now truly his disease.

We still talk daily.  I don’t know his readings from day to day.  He calls me when he has a problem. We troubleshoot issues together.  I still work on being okay with the fact that I don’t know his A1c.  I still struggle with not being able to hook him up to the technology that I want him to use.  Sweeping out the DMomma who is hands on and replacing her with the DMomma who is just there to help out when things get a little messy or he needs a break has truly been my biggest challenge.

As I have have been swept out of the trenches, I found myself struggling to understand my place on the sidelines.  I worried that I had not prepared him enough. I worried that I would not matter any more. I worried that I would no longer have a role in that community of diabetes parents that had been my home for so many years.

Just like cleaning our house can give you a new perspective, cleaning out my role as a DMomma did as well.  I have seen my son thrive on his own. I have seen him put to use what he has been taught and develop his own confidence.  Standing back has allowed me a new role in the diabetes community and in my son’s life…and its not that bad!

Sorry but its private

Day two of Dblog Week asks what we keep private. What is it that is off limits for sharing with our readers or maybe even family and friends? What will you never read about on these pages?

This is actually an interesting topic.  Once upon a time, there was almost nothing that you would not read on my blog pages. I was an open book in part because I never thought anyone else would read what I had to say.  It was my personal journal, sharing my most raw emotions. As friends and strangers began to read, things began to change.

I no longer write when emotionally charged. I still write posts with emotional attachments but I try to wait, write, re-write, wait, and then post after the fact. I want people to understand some of what I deal with as a parent of a child with diabetes but I don’t want them to lose the point in a sea of anger or frustration.

I no longer write my son’s name and very rarely the names of anyone around me out of respect for their privacy.  My son spent a lot of his early life with diabetes in the spotlight.  I wanted people to know more about the disease but I never considered that he’d preferred anonymity.  He did.  At 16, he laid down the law.  He wanted his privacy. He did not want to featured in diabetes related campaigns or any other displays.  I have learned to honour that.

Over time my life has changed and so too have my blog posts.  I now seek out topics that advocate and highlight issues of awareness.  Our life with diabetes has changed. It no longer consumes me 24/7.  It is simply a nagging thought in my head but a burden for my son to now carry almost solely on his own.  I can no longer moan about sleepless nights but I will still share my feelings of guilt at being able to sleep.

I will still share many emotions and experiences in my blog posts. I try to keep them real and from the heart.  Yes, there are a few things that you will never read about.  There are a few things that family and friends will never understand either but the important things that educate, advocate and raise awareness will always be shared.

Private!
Do not enter

 

 

Diabetes Made me Do it

Its the first day of another Diabetes Blog Week! I am so excited to be a part of this wonderful adventure once again.  As a blogger, it allows me to have topics chosen for me and write about topics that I may not have otherwise thought about.  As a reader, it gives me the chance to see many new blogs that I may not have come across before.  In other words, its a win-win week that I hope you enjoy as much as I do!

Today’s prompt asks me to share  what I have done because of diabetes that has made me the most proud or what good thing has diabetes brought into my life?

Obviously I am proud of the way my son is learning to handle his own diabetes care.  How much of that is up to me and how much is just his personality? We will never know but he takes each day in stride and never seems to complain about his lot in life. I can’t ask for much more than that!

For me personally, diabetes has brought an incredible network of friends.  Those friends have encouraged and inspired me to be involved and help to create changes to the world of diabetes in Canada.

It amazes me to look back at how long I have “known” some of these people.  There are the core group of parents that I met on the Children With Diabetes Parents Email list almost 15 years ago.  They have been with me through the good and bad.  They have been there with a hug or a shove in my personal life as well as in our life with diabetes.  The connections made there have been some of the dearest of any I have ever made.  They are truly the very, very best thing to come out of a life with diabetes.

With their encouragement and prodding, I began to look to see what I could do to better improve the lives of people with diabetes.  It led me into two areas–both dealing with fairness.  First there was the issue of fairness in our tax system.

Not long after my son’s diagnosis, I learned of a thing called the Disability Tax Credit.  In reading the description, I knew that my son qualified. In time,  I came to learn that the Canadian Revenue Agency did not always see things the same way that I did.  Some people with diabetes were qualifying, some weren’t.  Some people with diabetes were fighting for this right in court, some weren’t.  I sought to equalize the playing field and make the powers that be understand what was really involved in living with diabetes.

During this process, I met more amazing people.  There were families struggling to get by. There were adults who just wanted to be treated equitably and see some financial relief from the burden of diabetes care costs.  I interacted with many people, some I still hear from and others I see in posts on various social media platforms.  Each one was vital for their support and their belief in what we could do.

Together we did make a difference.  Today, all children under the age of 18 are given the DTC upon receipt of the T2201 from their doctor indicating a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes.  Adults are also eligible for this credit but still must first prove that they are intensively managing their diabetes care and that it takes over 14 hours per week.

When I read posts online about people getting this credit or when  I read others advising their friends to check out my website for tips and information, my heart swells. I know that I have made a difference.

The other thing that I have done because of diabetes that makes me proud is my work with parents and educators in regards to sending children with diabetes to school.  This issue has been something that I have worked on since my son was 3 years old.  He will soon be 18.  The situation is not perfect, but I am happy to say that there have been profound and real changes in how diabetes care is viewed in many Canadian schools.

When I began this journey, the only province to have any sort of legislation or provincial policy in place was New Brunswick.  To date, provinces such as Quebec, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and BC all at least mention the care and treatment of children with diabetes in schools in their provincial education policies.

We still have a long way to go but I no longer receive numerous telephone calls each fall from parents struggling to get help.  I hope that that is a sign that there is more and more support out there for families and students.

Diabetes is a crappy disease. It ruins holidays. It never goes away. Its unpredictable at times and never takes a rest.  It has however brought me a network of friends that have kept me sane throughout the years.  It has allowed me to help in areas that I never would have known about otherwise. For those things, I am truly happy to be able to say that “Diabetes made me do it!”d made me

 

 

Hello…I am a Glucometer

Diabetes Blog Week
Write a short story personifying a diabetes tool you use on a daily basis. A meter, syringe, pump, pill, etc. Give it a personality and a name and let it speak through you. What would it be happy about, upset about, mad about?  (Thank you Heather of Unexpected Blues for this topic.)

Hello, my name is Fred and I am a glucometer.  You would think with a job as important as mine that I would get a lot of respect but I don’t.  I am shoved in dark pockets, thrown around and basically taken for granted. Its a very rough life.

I am expected to be ready for service at all times of the day. It doesn’t matter if I worked hard all day, they still expect me to be bright-eyed and shining at three in the morning. And when I say shining, I mean that they really want me to light up all nice and bright showing them glowing pretty numbers. When they are done with me, they just toss me off to the side again.

My job is tireless.  They smear blood all over me.  They curse at me when they don’t like what the reading is.  Like that is my fault? How is it that I control what their blood glucose is going to be? I deserve a lot more respect.

The only time I get respect is when the parents or the doctor take a look at me.  They know how important I am.  They look at my display as if they are reading a holy gospel.  They value me and my knowledge.  My owner? Well, he looks at me like I am a rock, a burden that he is forced to carry around. I am the unwanted younger brother that he has to take everywhere.

Why does he have to think of me that way? It hurts my feelings. I am just trying to do my job. I am trying to work with him to keep him healthy.  I know that it can be tedious. It’s not picnic for me either. I mean, I have to be on all of the time! There is no time when I can be just a little less accurate. I have to bring my A-game every time we meet.  Its exhausting but I don’t get any praise or appreciation.

He just doesn’t get it and some times I get mad as well and when I do, I get even in my own way.  When he just grumpily and shoves a strip in me and expects me to instantly produce results, I come back and tell him “Error 4″.  Oh does that get his goat! He has to retest and take his time to treat me a little nicer–getting all of his blood just so on the test strip so that I will read it for him.  After he has done that, I reward him by saying “HI” but he doesn’t often see the humor in that one. I don’t understand why.  Isn’t it important to be friendly now and then? Perhaps if he could be a little nicer, we could work together a bit better and I wouldn’t have to resort to cheap jibes.

Maybe one day he will get it. One day he might understand how important I am! Oh well, at least he takes me most places. I usually only hear about the spots that we go to from the inside of a pocket but at least I get to tag along.  It’s not easy being me.  I guess it’s not easy being him either, but I still say, “work with me dude! It will make things so much easier!”  Darn! I shouldn’t have said that so loud, here comes another check. Back to work!

hi meter

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Four Hours, Just Four Hours

Diabetes Blog WeekYesterday we opened up about how diabetes can bring us down. Today let’s share what gets us through a hard day.  Or more specifically, a hard diabetes day.  Is there something positive you tell yourself?  Are there mantras that you fall back on to get you through?  Is there something specific you do when your mood needs a boost?  Maybe we’ve done that and we can help others do it too? (Thanks to Meri of Our Diabetic Life for suggesting this topic.)

Is there a mantra that I fall back on to get me through a hard diabetes day? Absolutely! It is one that I share with newly diagnosed adults and parents who are struggling to get through. I remind them to look at life in four-hour blocks. If you take everything in four-hour strides and you can ride through anything.

When diabetes seems to be kicking your butt every morning, look at how things are going between lunch and supper. Are things okay? Give yourself a mental high-five and celebrate that victory rather than dwelling on the post-breakfast spike that this threatening to drive you over the edge.

Do overnights seem overwhelming? Again, break it down.  How are things from snack until 12 or 1am? What is life like in the deepest part of the night? Are things settled before breakfast or has chaos been awakened in those four hours? If you break it down into six four-hour periods, life becomes a bit more manageable and instead of seeing all of the bad, you can savor some of the good.

Why do I have a four-hour mantra? Because early on I learned that my son’s Humalog was supposed to last about 4 hours.  He was injected at 8am for breakfast, then at noon for lunch, around 5pm for supper and then again at 9pm for his nighttime snack.  I was going crazy trying to see a perfect 24 hour day. I realized that looking at a complete day was never going to make me happy. The only way to see success was to look at small chunks of time.  Coincidentally, that was also how we would make changes to his regimen.  Was his breakfast ratio of carbs to insulin off? How about at bedtime? Life was naturally being broken down into 4 hour chunks for me so why not work with that?

Now I know some of you will say, but we are using a pump so that won’t work for me.  Yes it will!  Chances are high that you are still doing things like having breakfast, lunch and supper.  You are probably still going to bed at one point as well. All of these events can be broken down and again my four-hour mantra applied.  Was I a successful pancreas this afternoon? Yes? AWESOME!! Let’s break out the happy dance!!! Did I have an issue after supper? Okay, let’s look at what can be done.

Life is less overwhelming in four-hour shots. It can be applied it outside of diabetes as well.  Are you wanting to change your eating habits? Did you have a great breakfast? Pat yourself on the back. Over did it at lunch? Do better tomorrow. Can you see how easily this works?

Life can be overwhelming.  As we discussed yesterday, life with diabetes can make it worse.  Taking life four hours at a time has allowed me to focus on what I need to change and to praise myself when I get it right…and we all need a lot more praise in our lives.
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