Category Archives: site changes

It will be my wife’s job

“You need to do a site change.” 

My son replied, “I can’t do it by myself. Its in my arm. I can only do leg sites.”  

I asked him when this happened. He used to do almost all of site changes except the one arm that he couldn’t reach.  “What are you going to do when you leave home?”

“You are going to have to come over to where I am living and do it for me.  Not to worry though, I will stretch my site changes out to every four days to give you a bit of a break.”  He paused for a second thinking,”It will be a bit tougher though if I have to move away for work.  You will have to fly out to where ever I am.  I can’t afford to pay your travel though because I will need my entire pay cheque. I am sure you can work it out.”  

By now I am standing with my mouth hanging open truly amazed by his logic and my older son is rolling on the floor laughing at him.  My older son asked “How long do you expect her to travel?”

“Only until I get married. Once I have a wife it will be her job to do my site changes.”  

I pray he gets a wife that will see his logic! 


Welcome back to life with diabetes!

The new pump is on. The old basal rates have been retrieved. All rates are now posted on a sticky note beside my computer on top of the “MOTHER” heart my oldest son made for me back when he was probably in Grade 5 or so. 

My youngest son arrived home yesterday.  Together we sat down and uploaded the new pump and decided to try something different–we put food into the menu section of the pump.  Its a “thing” that allows you to have the carbs for favorite foods right there. We added the important things like Big Macs and Tim Horton’s Smoothies.  He was then good to go.

I really wanted to look over his meter and see what he had (or hadn’t) been doing while he was away.  I decided to let him settle back into his own routine first.  I thought about not looking at the meter at all.  What was it going to tell me? 

It would probably tell me that he ran way higher than I would like. It would probably tell me that he wasn’t testing when he was supposed to. It would probably just elevate my blood pressure and frustrate me.  There was nothing that I could do about the past. I was best to just focus on today and go forward. 

That was in an ideal world but by now you should know that I am far from ideal.  I had to look. I had to know. 

Just before bed, I asked him to see his meter. Despite the fact that I was sure that he was out of One Touch test strips, he swore that he had used an old green One Touch meter while he was away and left it behind (convenient!).  To make life simple for me however, he had found an old log book and written down all of his readings!  What a great child with diabetes.   

The logbook showed readings from every day.  There was one low.  There were some highs with notes as to what had happened. There were a few readings in range.  

My son waited for my reaction.  I said that I liked that he had written everything down but sadly he had logged before and created every single reading. I was not so sure that I could trust this book either. Part of me felt terrible for saying that. Part of me knew that there was a very good chance that I was right to doubt him.  Part of me hoped I was wrong.  I wanted to think that he did test when he wrote down that he did. I want to believe that the readings were all correct.  The diabetes police inside of me said that while some readings were right, he most likely did not have enough test strips for two weeks of using that meter.  His readings were far from perfect but not as bad as I would think that they should have been for all of the sites he swore he lost (four site changes in one day) as well as a pump that was failing. 

He just shrugged. I don’t know if that was saying “well I tried to get it by you.” or “I logged, you don’t believe me. Whatever.”  I hope its the first. Either way, today is a new day.  Last night was a night of highs.  Welcome home diabetes! 

Give him an Inch

I stumbled into my son’s room at 3am.  I grabbed his meter and tested. He was 18(325).  What the??? He was almost low a few nights ago.  He was a little high the night before but this is more than just a little high. What was going on?


An eye looked back at me. “Do you feel high?” I asked. 


“No” He mumbled from his bed.  


I checked his pump and he had corrected at 1am.  What was up? I asked him and he made some sort of excuse. I looked a bit closer. When was his last site change? BINGO!


The site reminder said he should have changed his site two days ago…around the time of the mysterious increases in bg levels.  Did said son do this? No, he pressed ignore and continued on with his XBox game.  


I have been obsessing over his testing. I have randomly checked his meter. I have made small tweaks BUT I did not write down on my calendar when his site needed to be changed (I am sooooo going to miss this feature when we have to give up our Cozmo).  Mom not nagging plus son ignoring equals a bad site that was causing unnecessary highs.  

Moral of the story…Mom needs to be more on the ball checking readings and noting when sites are to be changed followed by harping until those sites are actually changed.
 

Think of it like my birthday…

My son began to pile his site change supplies on the table. I was impressed. He was a day late for his site change but finally, without a lot of nagging from his mother, he was going to change his site!

“Don’t forget to bolus for that soup first before you do your site change.”

“I can’t. I am out of insulin.”

“What? What do you mean you are out of insulin?”

“I’m out of insulin.  Why do you think I am doing a site change?”

“Ah, maybe because it was due YESTERDAY!?”

My son looked at me like I was insane. I rolled my eyes and proceeded to continue on dealing with things that I had to do.

“Where are you going? You can’t leave. I need you to do my site change.”

“Why do you need me? Where are you putting your site?”

“In my leg.”

Now it was my turn to look at him like he was nuts.  “You don’t need me to do a leg site.  You are perfectly capable.”

“Yes, but Mom, you realize that you only have four more years to do site changes for me. I will turn 18 and move on and you will never have this opportunity again.  You should be savoring these times just like you say how important it is to share each birthday with me before I leave home. Actually, think of these site changes as being just like my birthday but every three days.  Treasure them. In fact, we can make it like my birthday if you want. You can even buy me presents for each site change done!”

His logic is interesting if nothing else!

Note to self, do not tell him how important it is to value time spent with a loved one again. Our idea of quality time seems to be a very different!