diabetes in school

Going to School with Diabetes Has Changed

Today’s prompt for Diabetes Blog Week asks what changes we have seen since diagnosis.

In the past 15+ years, we have seen a lot of changes.  We have seen 5 second glucometer results instead of 30 torturous seconds. We have seen long acting insulin, smart pumps and now sensor augmented pumps.  We have seen Continuous Glucose Monitors go from blinded instruments that you could only get from the hospital to tools that you can wear every day to watch real time trends!

One of the biggest changes that I have seen since my son was diagnosed with diabetes however is how provinces, school boards, and schools are now dealing with children with diabetes here in Canada.

I first began dealing with this issue when my son was 3.  He still had a year to go before he would enter the school system, but the school knew about my knowledge of diabetes care.  They wanted a heads  up on what to expect when a recently diagnosed student returned to school.  Together we were able to explore the roles and needs of both staff and student.

I spent time looking at what was being done in other provinces and other schools.  The results shocked me.  With the exception of New Brunswick, most areas had little to no policies for children with diabetes in schools.  The only thing that they tended to note was whether or not (and usually it was not), they would administer insulin in school and where the insulin was to be kept.

At first I was shocked. Diabetes was not a new disease.  How could it not be dealt with in the school system? Easily…in previous years multiple daily injections, home blood glucose monitoring and insulin pumps were not the norm in diabetes care.  Times were changing and school policies needed to change as well…and they have.

In 2015 provinces such as Newfoundland and Quebec now also have provincial policies in place.  Provinces such as British Columbia are working with their nursing staff to see better protection in place.  In other provinces, people are still working to find something that works for all parties.

The big difference is that today, provinces and parents are talking. Today, school boards are contacting myself, the Canadian Diabetes Association, and parents of children with diabetes to ask what our children’s needs are. There is a willingness to learn and a willingness to create change.

This does not mean that the problem of care for children with diabetes in Canada is solved. It does not mean that parents have no concerns when they send their children with diabetes to schools.  It means that in more places, there are less concerns. It means that in more schools there is already education and policy in place. That is a wonderful thing.  It shows that over time things can change for the better. I am positive that the next 15 years will see many more leaps and bounds for our children with diabetes as they return to school.

diabetes in school
Heading to school with diabetes can be stressful

4 thoughts on “Going to School with Diabetes Has Changed”

  1. What a great insight into how the care for children with diabetes at school has evolved over the years! Thanks for publishing this.

  2. There seem to be problems in B.C. though. The new provincial policies are aimed at restraining boards that were providing more care than what the nursing service deemed appropriate. And the nursing service seems to think that sliding scale is appropriate and takes no heed of hypoglycemic unawareness. A real mess there I’d say.

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