Tag Archives: diabetes care

Preparing for Disasters with Type 1 Diabetes

diabetes emergency listThis year we have seen many mandatory evacuations because of both hurricanes and fires.  When you live with diabetes in your home, how do you prepare for disasters? Do you have a list of evacuation supplies checked off and ready to go?

People in the hurricane states, often have a emergency tote or bag that they can grab on the way out of the door but remembering everything that you could need can be a challenge.  Over the years, we have come up with a detailed list of evacuation supplies for people with diabetes on the Diabetes Advocacy website.  In lieu of recent events, I thought that it might be a good time to go over some of the items with you.

Keep a container near the door

As I mentioned, it is important to have all of your supplies in a quick, easy to grab container.  Evacuations can be planned, but sometimes you are only given minutes to have all of your valuables ready to leave.  Make sure your diabetes bag is always in the same place so that you won’t waste valuable time trying to find it.

Packing Basics

Make sure that you have some of the basics like a Frio pack if you live in a warm climate.  You will also want a flashlight and spare batteries in case your area loses power.  Candles and wooden matches can also provide light and heat if need be.

A first aid kit should also be in your emergency container. While you may have a lot of diabetes supplies, other medical emergencies can happen and basic first aid is a must.  Don’t forget to add anti-diarrhea and anti-nausea medication to your kit.  You should also have copies of all prescriptions in case you are away from your home pharmacy and need to access your medication refills.

Food and drink

We have all seen the images of people stocking up on cases of water and in an emergency it is vital.  If you have drinkable tap water, fill up milk jugs, juice jugs and other items with water to take with you.  Also pack juice packs, tinned food as well as cheese and cracker snacks. If you pack tinned items, don’t forget a hand can-opener as well.

Diabetes Supplies

It is recommended that you pack two weeks worth of diabetes supplies with you during an evacuation.  Consider bring a spare meter, spare batteries, alcohol wipes, pump supplies, insulin, syringes, ketone strips, and medical tape.

Other items to remember

Don’t forget to bring spare blankets, cash in case bank machines are down, and pet food for your furry family members.

I am sure that I have forgotten a few things but I would suggest that you view the Diabetes Advocacy Emergency page and print off a copy of the emergency supplies checklist.  This will help you feel a bit more prepared should a disaster hit your community.

Diabetes is hard! Some days you’re the windshield…some days you’re the bug

This post was originally written in 2009.  My son now manages his own diabetes care .  He wakes for his lows.  He treats his highs but one thing remains the same–diabetes is hard no matter who is responsible for care for the daily tasks. 

Diabetes is hard

“Some days you’re the windshield, some days you’re the bug.” Today I am definitely feeling like the bug!

It was after midnight and of course I was dying to get to sleep. I had set my alarm for early the next morning.  It would be my son’s last day of school.

I found a meter and a strip. I grabbed a lancet, waded through all of the junk that the boys had left on the stairs rather than putting away and was off to test my son’s blood sugar level. I hope it would be the last check for a few hours. One check and I could sleep!

We had been out for pizza earlier that day to celebrate good grades so I was certain that my youngest son would still be high. He had been  16 mmol (288) earlier in the evening  so you know I was certain that I was  going to be able to rest.

Wrong! Diabetes doesn’t work that way.

I took the meter. I lanced his finger  and created a pool of  blood. The strip refused to suck. What the???? Okay, I cleaned the finger. I got more blood. I tried again. The glucometer just barely accepted the blood. I waited for the reading…E5. It was an error reading!! There hadn’t been enough blood to get a blood sugar reading. Oh the lovely four letter words that were on the tip of my tongue as I headed back downstairs to get new equipment.

I found a new meter. I was certain that this one had to be better than the last. A new test strip was in my hand. The same lancing device was being used. Back up the stairs I went.  This time I grumbled and picked up items as I went.

Once again, I lanced my son’s finger. Again, I got a large amount of blood. The strip sucked the blood  this time! I walked towards the stairs not even considering having to correct a high blood glucose reading. That was a good thing because he didn’t need insulin.  He was 3.2 (57). He was low!

I uttered a few more choice words as I shuffled off to get some juice. I filled a glass, found a straw and trudged up the stairs for a third time in less than five minutes.

My son wasn’t keen on drinking. I continued to cajole him until he finally began to  sip. Thankfully he drank it all except the last few drops. Those were sucked up into the straw and somehow flew all over his pillow.  I was not happy.  There was now strawberry juice all over a cream pillow case.  I cleaned it off as best as I could and  waited.

Fifteen minutes can become a lifetime when you are dying for sleep. These are the moments when you just think to yourself…diabetes is hard.  Why us?

Eventually it was time to retest.  He was  5.5 (99) and I was finally off to bed for two hours before it would be time to test again.

Diabetes is hard.  Diabetes care is a challenge.  Some days things seem okay…and other days you feel like you are a bug squished against a windshield.

 

 

Tips for Managing Diabetes in the Summer

diabetes family summer partyIts summer!! I mean it really is finally summer! Some areas have been enjoying great weather for a bit but where I live–well, I kind of wondered if summer was ever going to show up.   Now that it is really here, let’s talk about a few tips for managing diabetes in the summer months.

Keep your insulin and test strips cool.

Summer heat can literally ruin blood glucose test strips and insulin.  If you are on injections, make sure to keep your insulin stored in a cool place. If you are pumping, again, make sure that your pump doesn’t get overheated.  You may even want to consider changing out your cartridges more often to ensure that your insulin is fresh and hasn’t been compromised by the heat.

Test strips also react to extreme temperatures.  Again also make sure that they are stored in a cool place.  If you are traveling to the beach or theme parks, you may want to invest in a FRIO Insulin Cooling Pump Wallet.  They are convenient little cooling packs that will help to keep things chilled.

If you don’t have access to Frio packs, another great suggestion is to use frozen juice packs.  You can keep your supplies cool and are prepared for lows!

Mastistol and Antiperspirant are pumpers’ new best friends.

Summer often means swimming and swimming can mean chlorine. Chlorine can bring extra headaches for people with diabetes using an insulin pump in the summer. Personally,  the only way for us  to keep sites on in chlorine was by making sure that a product  like Fernandale Mastisol Liquid Adhesive was used on the skin prior to set insertion.

For people using an insulin pump and/or a CGM, you may also want to look at using an antiperspirant on the site.  Apply a light coat of antiperspirant (not deodorant) to the insertion site area.  This will help to keep sites in place when your body begins to sweat!

Have snacks everywhere.

Summer heat can bring its own challenges for managing diabetes. It tends to mean more exertion and rapidly dropping blood glucose levels.  Make sure to carry extra snack foods with you wherever you go.  One parent suggests that you stock up on Freezies.  They are perfect treats for lows and also help ward off dehydration.  Other families have suggested fruit and frozen grapes as must have snacks for on the go.

Drink lots of water.

Dehydration is a real problem in the heat.  It is especially important for people living with diabetes to stay hydrated because dehydration will cause blood glucose levels to spike.

Test often.

Heat, exhaustion and the fun of the sun can really mess with blood glucose levels so make sure that you test often to avoid any serious diabetes related emergencies.

Bring extras!

As I have said, infusion sets can fall out.  Blood sugar levels can go crazy.  It is vital that you carry extras of everything–extra snacks, extra water, extra test strips, extra insulin and extra infusion sets just in case.

Wear sunscreen.

I know, everyone is supposed to wear sunscreen so really is this a diabetes issue? Well no…and yes! It turns out that sunburns have been known to really mess with blood glucose levels.  The moral of the story? Stay hydrated and wear sunscreen to help keep blood glucose levels in check.

Have fun!

Finally, in Canada especially, we just don’t seem to see summer for long enough so plan ahead and enjoy all that this summer has to offer you and your family!

*please note that affiliate links have been used in this post.  While these links do not direct to the only places to purchase the highlight products, purchasing from the links does support the work of Diabetes Advocacy

I don’t have diabetes but diabetes can still bring me down.

Diabetes is exhausting.  The emotional toll of test, calculate, bolus is incredible. I am lucky.  I don’t have diabetes, but diabetes can still bring me down.  Because I don’t have diabetes, when it does tend to be too much I can step away,  put it on the back burner and regroup before I dive  in again. I wish everyone with diabetes had it that easy.

For years I was my son’s external pancreas.  It was exhausting.  I never slept more than four hours at a time.  If I woke up during the night, I tested his blood glucose levels.  We had no CGMs.  We just had me. It was my job to make sure that he was in range.  I was the one to calculate carbs, adjust insulin ratios and log blood glucose readings.

My son tested and learned alongside of me but I carried the bulk of the burden…until he turned 16.  At 16, he decided that he could handle it all.  He carried the entire burden for the next three years unless he was visiting me.  When he was with me, I took over as much as he wanted.

Taking over wasn’t the same as doing it 24/7.  That being said, being an external pancreas also wasn’t the same as being the one to experience the highs, lows and pokes with needles multiple times per day.  Not being able to “fix it” or take it away could (can) bring me down as much as the pressure of daily diabetes care.

I  still wish that I could take the pain away. I wish that my son would know a different life.  There isn’t a day that I don’t ache for the families and other people living with diabetes knowing that they can never stop testing or injecting.  Their very lives depended on it.

As I  brush away those feelings, a new sadness often creeps in and diabetes can bring me down again.  The new sadness often comes from   my advocacy efforts.

Ever since my son’s diagnosis, I have worked very hard in various advocacy arenas.  I have worked with grassroots groups, individuals and large organizations to see changes for children and adults living with type 1 diabetes.  This means that I also am exposed to the worst in the diabetes world.  People come to me when they are struggling and don’t know where else to turn.

Don’t get me wrong, I love being that shoulder. I love being able to give back to them in the same way that others were there for me.  The problem for me arises when we can’t see a perfect resolution.  I ache when someone comes to me with a situation that I know there is just no current solution for. I want to fix it desperately but when I can’t?  Diabetes can bring me down.

At some points that sadness because I can’t fix it has been overwhelming.  Those are the times that I have had to step back a bit. I have had to reduce the time I spent on issues and allow myself to step back from the advocacy arena.  During these times, I remind myself that there are many others out there who can handle it just as well and I regroup.

I will admit, sometimes diabetes has brought me down so far that I wondered if I would come back.  Had my advocacy usefulness past? Was I too cynical? I can’t really answer that but I can say that I recharge and am pulled back into the ring by families and individuals who continue to reach out looking to me for help.

I don’t have diabetes.  Diabetes can still bring me down but it never keeps me down.  Each day I wake ready to work a little harder.  Each day I will share what has worked for us and hope to inspire and assist others living with diabetes.  I will continue to work with individuals and groups to create better care for people with diabetes regardless of education or income level.  Diabetes can bring me down but it will not win. My battle won’t end until a cure is found.

Diabetes is an exceptionally costly disease

Its Day 2 of Diabetes Blog week and today we look at the high costs of diabetes care.  Diabetes takes a toll on the person living with the disease, on their relationships and on their wallets. Diabetes is an exceptionally costly disease.

diabetes is costlyFrom the moment the diagnosis comes in, your world begins to shatter.  Quickly you learn that the days of grabbing a snack on the run or leaving the house with just your keys are over.

Diabetes means that your brain must constantly be on.  You must always be thinking about carb counts, blood glucose levels, insulin on board, and a thousand other factors that were previously irrelevant to you.  The mental exhaustion is real.  The toll on the person with diabetes, their caregivers and those around them is significant.

When living with diabetes, it is vital to have supports and to use them! When a friend or partner offers to help, accept it. It doesn’t matter if they do things a little differently.  If no one dies, then it’s a win.  Accept the help.  Take a break. You need it.

Unfortunately it is not just the emotional and physical aspects of diabetes care that can be taxing.  Diabetes is an exceptionally costly disease when it comes to your finances as well.  If you don’t have excellent  insurance coverage, the stresses of life with diabetes are magnified a thousand times over.

For those of us living in Canada, there are a few benefits. First, we don’t have the absolutely ridiculously high insulin costs that our friends to the south are being subjected to.  My son was pleasantly surprised when he was forced to buy his first vial of insulin and it cost him less than $40.

$40 for a person who is in school and working part-time is enough of a cost however.  Thankfully his expense is temporary.  He has two options for coverage. He is trying to get back on his father’s insurance because he is in school.  If that becomes more of a hassle than it is worth, he can still apply for the provincial drug plan to help offset the costs of diabetes supplies.

If you don’t have those options however, diabetes is exceptionally costly.  In February of 2015, I sat down and figured out exactly how costly it would be for me to have Type 1 diabetes and use an insulin pump.   I don’t have private health care coverage, I am too old for the current provincial insulin pump program and I wouldn’t qualify for much of a rebate through our provincial program because of income.

For me to use a sensor augmented insulin pump to maintain my diabetes care, in 2015, I established that it would cost me approximately $14,500 per year.  That is over $1200 per MONTH.  Obviously this total would be drastically reduced if I just wanted to use a syringe and injections.  Either way, I would still require insulin, syringes, test strips, ketone strips, alcohol swabs and glucose tablets to just name a few items to stay alive.

Can you imagine being a young adult and having to save, at minimum, the amount of a car payment just to cover your expenses? What if you wanted to have a family but you have diabetes? You need to be able to afford diapers, clothes, food and diabetes supplies for yourself.  Even those who no longer have children are not immune.  No matter what your age, you carry the need to pay for life-sustaining medical equipment for as long as you live.  That must be exhausting.

There is no cure. There is no end in sight.  All those of us who love people with diabetes can do is continue to offer emotional support.  We can continue to assist with care and those of us in the advocacy realm can continue to ask governments and insurance companies to provide greater help.  Diabetes is an exceptionally costly disease. We must do all we can to help our loved ones deal with it.

Which Liberal Government?

The summer is over and it’s now time to get back to work.

This summer I saw a number of variations of this status posted all over Facebook…

“I would like to highlight the Liberal government removing the subsidy for blood test strips. Diabetics need very frequent blood testing, up to 5+ times a day. The cost of strips is $70.00 – outcome – reduced blood glucose testing and more hospital admissions from hyper or hypo glycemic episodes.
Diabetes . . . I am asking if everyone could put this as their status for 1 hour. I’m pretty sure I know the ones that will. Think of someone you know or love who has or has had diabetes. My hope is that in 2016 a cure will be found. Will you post it for 1 hour? To honor those who have fought or are fighting diabetes.? “

Many people were sharing this status.  Many more were asking…where is this from? Whose government is doing this? The answers were surprising.

liberalsI was certain that it was Newfoundland.  This spring the new Liberal government  announced changes to the provincial prescription drug plan.  They were limiting the number of test strips to 2500 annually for those using MDI, 700 for those using just a long acting insulin, 100 for those not using insulin and 50 for those who have only recently been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.*

As this post continued to make its rounds however, I was shocked to see that a number of other locations were also claiming that this was a reality in their home area. People from as far away as Australia were saying that this had happened to them.  They said it was their government that the post was directed at.  All I could think was, “this is crazy!”

For years, study after study has shown how important tight control and home blood glucose monitoring is.  They have shown that good control equates to improved health outcomes AND immediate financial benefit in terms of reduced loss of work. Why would governments think that they were saving money by cutting access to blood glucose testing strips?

This entire scenario hits too close to home as my son turns 19. He may soon be in a position of losing his health care coverage.  His days of being covered by his father’s private health care plan are numbered.   My stomach aches each time I think of this safety net being taken away.  He does have some coverage from the province.  We will find a way but what about other children?

I don’t mean small children, I mean adults who are struggling to find their way.  What about them? What about their families? How do they cope? How do you work a minimum wage job, pay your rent, buy your groceries AND cover your diabetes care costs?

Again, we know how important blood glucose testing is. As parents, we have spent years asking  our children “Did you test?” and “What was your blood glucose reading?”  How do they answer those questions when they can’t afford the test strips? How accurate will their guess have to be?

Without proper testing, they cannot accurately dose their insulin. They cannot make exact judgement calls on corrections.  They will run a high risk of complications.  They most likely will have more sick days.  This will cost governments more money in lost tax revenue and create an increased drain on hospital services.

If a person with diabetes is unable to test and stop potentially dangerous high blood glucose levels on their own, they will be forced to seek hospital treatments.  A 2008 report in the Toronto Star suggests that one typical hospital stay then cost approximately $7000**.  $7000…you can get 100 strips for $80-$100.  If you test 8-10 times per day that one hospital stay would still  cost more than 2 years worth of test strips. Two years. 

It would appear that the people in charge of making these policy changes need to better understand what they have done.  Basic math shows the folly in such policies. We can only hope that public pressure and common sense will ultimately prevail.  Our loved ones with diabetes need access to the proper medical supplies to ensure that they can continue to be healthy, productive members of our societies.

*http://www.thetelegram.com/News/Local/2016-04-17/article-4500650/Changes-coming-to-provincial-drug-program/1

**https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2008/03/18/average_hospital_stay_costs_nearly_7000_study.html

 

He’s Got This

Over Easter, my youngest son came to visit.  Each time he visits me I am shocked by how much he has grown. My little boy is long gone and a young man is emerging. A child with diabetes is being replaced by a young person with diabetes and I stand in awe.

This time I stood back a bit more. I tried not to fall into old habits of taking over care or nagging about testing. I gently reminded. I compared carb counts now and again when asked.  I tested him at night at his request but mostly I sat and watched.

I wondered how his care was going. He hasn’t told me an A1c in years. I worried about his rates. I worried about his health.  The more I tested, the more I watched, the more my pride grew.

He wasn’t perfect.  He still doesn’t test as much as I would like but when he did test, his results were awesome. When he ate junk, which he doesn’t do as much any more, he nailed the bolus.  When he spiked because of a low cartridge and air being delivered instead of insulin, the spike was no longer in the 20s (360+) it hovered in the low teens.

I sat back and realized that he’s got this.  All of those years of preaching, teaching and sharing have paid off.  He is taking care of himself.  He is trying to protect his body from itself and doing a good job.

In a recent conversation I reminded him that he is the expert in his care.  It is his job to ensure that he is able to demonstrate that to medical professionals that he sees.  He should listen to them and be willing to accept their help but he may also have to remind them that he has been doing this all of his life.  He has been privileged to be trained by some of the very best people in diabetes care in the world.  He has a very good handle on things and a huge support network to reach out to when he is in doubt.

He explained that he finds that very frustrating.  He doesn’t want to get into a contest of who knows more when he sees someone but he feels that after all of these years he does know his body.  He is very healthy.  He has got this…and he has!

hes-got-this-poster2

I am dead tired…and feeling guilty

I am worn out, dragged out, dead tired…after just two nights.

I am out of practice.

I want a CGM.

I want a cure.

I feel guilty. I can’t wait to get my sleep back again.

My son came to visit for a few days.  It was the best Easter gift…having both of my boys here with my for Easter dinner! I was over the moon.

Diabetes had to tag along for the ride.  It could have stayed behind.  It played better than it has on some visits however.

I was pleasantly surprised when I got up to test my youngest son on the first night.  He was a perfect 5 (90).  I didn’t sleep. He was perfect. Exactly in range.  What was next? Would he rise? Would he go low? I didn’t sleep. I rested now and then. I checked.  He dropped a bit. Not enough to worry about. I tried to sleep. I worried.

The next night we had the opposite problem.  His cartridge had run low.  His blood glucose went up.  It didn’t go up as high as it had on previous visits.  He is even more fixated on his health and improving his control on his own.  He corrected. He had command of this.

Once again I awoke during the night. I went to his room and tested.  He was high still. He corrected.  I went back to bed.  I wondered if he would drop. I wondered if he would go higher.  I worried. I tried to sleep but I worried.

Tonight he will be in charge of his own care again.He will be the one to wake.  I will wake up just like I have for too many years.  I will wonder what his readings are but I will be able to  roll over and go back to sleep. I won’t be kept awake with a low. I won’t wonder which direction a high will take even with a correction. I will simply roll over and try to sleep…but I will feel guilty because I can just roll over.

I put in my time. I had 16 plus years of sleepless nights between babies and diabetes.  My son has had 16 years of diabetes too.He doesn’t get an end.  As I said, he has become very conscious of his health and his body.  He told me that he already has one faulty organ, so he has to make sure that he doesn’t have any more.

He is growing up.  He is a young adult now. He takes most  things in stride.  I still wish that he could have an end to testing, injecting, carb counting, lows, highs and all of the rest.  Wishing doesn’t make it so. Feeling guilty doesn’t change allow us to change places.  This is just the way it is.   I will keep wishing for that day when I can say “that was the way it was.”

tired

Save today and save more tomorrow

In Canada the economy is in a mess. All levels of government seem to have an incredible debt load. They are constantly in the media looking for ways to save money. They are asking people where they feel that they can make cuts.

I have also been reading posts about adults with diabetes who are having to pay for their own syringes and strips. There are stories of young adults asking why they are paying for needles that keep them alive when drug addicts are getting needles to keep them high for free. There are conversations about seniors who have no coverage at all or are given one box of test strips to cover them for an entire year. My heart breaks for these people. I am terrified for their health. I seriously wonder what governments have been thinking for all of these years.

I have been at this diabetes advocacy thing for many, many years now. Back when I was first gathering information on the cost of insulin pump therapy versus the savings, I learned about the high cost of complications. I quickly understood however, that the government of now is not interested in the worries of the government of tomorrow. They were not interested in paying for pumps and quality care today to save on dialysis tomorrow. They wanted to not pay for dialysis today. This shortsightedness has led us to where we are today.

I am not sure what the cost of a hospital stay is currently but the Toronto Star put it at $7000 per visit in 2008.

According to Diabetes Depot, for $7000 you can purchase…

  • 61 5x3mL cartridges of Lantus
  • 50 5x3ml cartridges of Levemir
  • 206 10ml vials of Novorapid
  • 215 10ml vials of Humalog
  • boxes of 100 Lifescan glucometer strips
  • 184 boxes of 100 per box BD Ultrafine II Insulin Syringes 1/2cc 30 gauge
  • 116 boxes of Animas insulin cartridges
  • 37 boxes of Paradigm Quick-set infusion sets
  • 22boxes of 5 per box Enlite Glucose sensors
  • One insulin pump (which is guaranteed for 4-5 year)

So for every time a person with diabetes goes to the hospital–and my old research said that on average a person with diabetes may go into the hospital for an emergency three times per year if they were not well-managed, the government could have bought them syringes, or insulin, or strips, or all of the above and saved money.

If a person was hospitalized TWICE per year, based on my calculation last year, the government could have paid for a sensor augmented pump AND all of its supplies for the year for the same amount.

Sadly provinces are not covering sensor augmented pumps.  Many provinces are not covering pumps for adults.  There are provinces not covering insulin, syringes or test strips for people living with diabetes.  That worries me greatly.

It worries me that people are not able to properly take care of themselves.  It worries me that governments are looking for ways to cut costs without looking at the bigger picture.  I have sat at pre-budget consultation tables.  I have asked and have heard others ask for governments to invest in keeping people healthy today so that we don’t have to pay much larger bills tomorrow.

I don’t know when they will truly begin to listen.  I will continue to suggest as I know many others of you will as well, that they look at preventative measures over short term cuts.  In the meantime, I will be saddened and worried for those who struggle to afford proper medical care and treatment.  I will also be motivated by them as well.

Together we will one day see real change for all of our sakes.

diabetes supplies

 

The Transition Year Troubles

Last week it was  rough being a mother of a young man with diabetes.  My son wasn’t in DKA or anything as horrible as that.  He was tripping up in the world of paperwork, bureaucracy and diabetes care.

Two years ago he decided that he was old enough to handle his diabetes care, appointments and schooling on his own. He chose to move to live with his father and take over the responsibility on all of those fronts.  I was forced to stand on the sidelines and offer advice now and again when asked.

I was also left to order supplies for his pump on a semi-regular basis and this is where the trouble began…

I had placed an order for his infusion sets and cartridges.  On Tuesday I received a message on my phone.  It stated that coverage for my son’s supplies had been refused.  I was to either pay the almost $800 bill immediately or return all supplies.

What the heck? My son was under 25 with no insurance.  The provincial pump program was supposed to cover him. Had he fallen through the cracks? Did someone forget to do his paperwork?

I immediately began making calls and sending out emails.  I was sent a copy of the forms that should have been completed for him.  I called the woman at the pump company back.   Slowly the truth began to emerge and it wasn’t pretty…

The pump company hadn’t received new paperwork for my son regarding provincial pump coverage since 2014.

His diabetes center had only seen him once per year but the provincial policy requires him to see someone three times per year.  He had missed most of his appointments.  They had warned him that doing so would result in lost coverage.  He never paid attention.

His diabetes center was for pediatric care and they believed that he had been transferred to an adult center.  They suggested that I contact his former doctor (whom my son felt was still handling his care).

I called his doctor.  I was desperate for some sort of help both in getting my son to realize how important his attendance at appointments were and finding coverage for his pump supplies.

His doctor would not take my call but did say that he was continuing to care for my son.  Because my son is 18, his doctor felt that it was up to him to fix the mess that he created.  Fair point.  I passed the message along.  My son made the call.

It is a new week.  A glass or two of wine helped me to decompress.  My son is hopefully beginning to understand that while Mom is always there to help, being “of age” means that he has to handle things.

He has a call into his doctor to set up an appointment and chat about what he can do next.  His doctor is willing to help him get things straightened out (him not Mom) . He has booked an appointment with a diabetes clinic closer to his home to ensure that he can make the appointment.

These sound like small things.  In our world they are massive but we will find out way through…and at least there is still wine.

wine