Tag Archives: diabetes conversations

Six things not to say to parents of children with diabetes

things you dont say to a parent of a child with diabetesPeople generally mean well but sadly many just don’t think before they open their mouths.  I therefore thought that it might be a good idea to create a little list for them of thing that you really should NOT ever NEVER say to parents of children with diabetes. Consider it a personal service announcement if you will…

My cat had diabetes

Really? Seriously? Because we know that you injecting your cat’s fur with insulin is really identical to chasing a toddler around the room with a syringe,  pinning them down and explaining that you are stabbing them for the fourth time today because you love them.  Yes, I am sure they are exactly the same.

Yes, there was an eye roll here.

My great-aunt Thelma died of diabetes

Thank you.  I needed to hear that.  I have guilt on top of guilt about not protecting my child from this disease and you tell me that your 90 year old aunt died because of diabetes?

Odds are that she had Type 2 diabetes and at 90…well her odds weren’t the greatest for lasting long anyway but yeah, I can see where I needed to know this.

This is why parents of children with diabetes have bruises on their heads. They spend a lot of time banging it against a wall in frustration. .

Don’t worry. I am sure that your child will grow out of it.

The odds of my child outgrowing their diabetes are lot  less likely than as you overcoming your ignorance of what type 1 diabetes really is.

Nope, growing out of diabetes is not an option.  My child’s pancreas is just no longer doing its job.  We have tried everything we could to revive it but its dead. Gone. No functioning beta cells to produce insulin.  No hope.

On the upside, I would really encourage you to do a bit of Googling or even ask some questions of me and then listen.  Truly listen to what I will tell you and you might be surprised at what you can learn. Your ignorance can be cured!

Perhaps if you hadn’t given your child so much sugar, then he/she wouldn’t have gotten diabetes.

Perhaps if you had not thought that they said “trains” when they were handing out “brains” and decided that you didn’t want to go for a ride, you would have a bit more of a clue.

Having a child with diabetes brings enough guilt.  I fret over what I could have done. I berate my faulty gene pool for allowing this to happen to my baby. Despite these things, I did not cause my child to develop diabetes. What my child ate had nothing to do with his diagnosis.  Really.

Would she prefer a diabetic chocolate?

Eeeekkkk!! Run! Fast! Actually if you eat many of those chocolates you will have to run fast–to the washroom.  Many diabetic candies are filled with sugar alcohols that can cause diarrhea.

Thankfully, my child is able to balance insulin injections with food intake so regular candy is just fine.  We do appreciate you trying though.

Perhaps you may want to relook at how many of those candies you have as well.  I kid you not.  They are nasty!

Is their diabetes under control?

Control? What is that???  A parent of a child with type 1 diabetes is trying to keep a blood sugar fluctuation of .54grams per liter on a constant basis despite over 25 influencing factors trying to mess with things.   Imagine that…trying to maintain a balance of less than one gram of sugar with the influence of stress, food, exercise and 20+ other things!  Can you see why  as parents we simply celebrate when they get even two readings in range?

It’s a big deal.  Diabetes is a really complicated disease.  Most parents of children with diabetes are doing their very best to balance allowing their child to be a normal kid and trying desperately to manage blood sugar levels so that their children feel healthy.  It is a huge challenge.

Parents of children with diabetes appreciate when you care.  Really we do, but please, please, please, think before you speak!

There are certain things that you really truly should not say to parents of children with diabetes.  Offer them a smile, a sympathetic ear, a kind word even.  Honestly, they are much more appreciated.