Tag Archives: DTC

The Disability Tax Credit for Adults…What you need to know

Disability Tax Credit tipsThe Disability Tax Credit is a non-refundable tax credit available to Canadians who meet a very strict criteria set out by the Canadian Revenue Agency.  One of the criteria is that you must take over 14 hours per week to perform life-sustaining therapy.  This is the section that many people living with diabetes qualify under.  Before you apply there are a few things that you need to know.

Having diabetes doesn’t mean that you qualify.

Not everyone with diabetes will qualify for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC).  The criteria states that children with Type 1 diabetes qualify . Adults (anyone over 18 years of age) however, must show that they spend over 14 hours per week on their care.

Why do children get the DTC so easily?

The reason that children qualify  for the Disability Tax Credit is because CRA feels that the time that they spend on their care AND the time that their parents spend on their care, together is equal to more than 14 hours per week.  Adults do not require the help of others for the most part. Therefore must prove that they, themselves spend over 14 hours per week on therapy to keeping themselves alive.

Do I really spend 14 hours per week keeping myself alive?

That is a question that only you can answer.  I will say that if you are intensively managing your diabetes, then more than likely, you do take an inordinate amount of time out of your day to manage your diabetes care.

A person who is not reliant on an external source of insulin to live does not have to be concerned about blood glucose readings, anticipated activity levels, impending illness,  or fat contents of meals when planning their day to day activities.  The average person does not have to draw up a syringe, put in an infusion set or calibrate a continuous glucose monitoring sensor.  A person without diabetes does not have to keep track of their insulin requirements, blood glucose levels or activity levels in a journal.

These tasks, while commonplace for a person with diabetes, are all tasks that are recognized by CRA and count towards the 14 hour total required to be certified for the Disability Tax Credit as requiring life sustaining therapy.

I hear that adults no longer qualify so why should I try?

Some adults are experiencing a harder time getting the tax credit.  There can be many reasons for your application being denied.  You may be including tasks that are not recognized by CRA as being an allowable part of therapy.  Things like grocery shopping, doctors appointments and trips to the pharmacy are not allowed to be included in your total.

Another reason that adults are being turned down is because they are not providing details on their own specific care.  Often people are turning to internet groups that have sample forms filled out. They then simply copy and paste the details that they have found. You should be  using that information as a guide and filling out the application in your own words with your own specific care details.  CRA is noticing a pattern of applications and is now beginning to question their authenticity.

What does that mean?

It means that you need to make your application your own.  Spend one week detailing what you do each day.  It will take you a lot of time to stop and write everything down.  Time each task.  Note how often you perform it.

Take this week’s worth of information and then compare it to your online resources.  Eliminate the tasks that CRA won’t approve.  Add in the tasks that you did but forgot to add in your personal list.  Now total your time spent.  Most likely, you will find that you spend more than 14 hours per week on your care.  This data can also be shared with your doctor at your appointment. It will help he/she understand who much time you do put into your care.  This will further be of use if he/she if they receive a follow up letter from CRA asking for more details on your care.

Adults with insulin dependent diabetes who test regularly (6+ times per week), who inject insulin multiple times per day through injections or an insulin pump, and make their own adjustments to their insulin regimen should apply for the Disability Tax Credit.  If you are turned down, you have the right to ask for your application to be approved by another CRA staff member. Sometimes the second review still does not turn out in your favour but don’t despair. At that point,  you have the right to see all correspondence used in your file and begin a formal appeal process.

If you are unsure of how to fill in your application or you just want someone to review your totals, I can assist you. Email me or check out the Disability Tax Credit page for more details on receiving assistance.

 

Diabetes Made me Do it

Its the first day of another Diabetes Blog Week! I am so excited to be a part of this wonderful adventure once again.  As a blogger, it allows me to have topics chosen for me and write about topics that I may not have otherwise thought about.  As a reader, it gives me the chance to see many new blogs that I may not have come across before.  In other words, its a win-win week that I hope you enjoy as much as I do!

Today’s prompt asks me to share  what I have done because of diabetes that has made me the most proud or what good thing has diabetes brought into my life?

Obviously I am proud of the way my son is learning to handle his own diabetes care.  How much of that is up to me and how much is just his personality? We will never know but he takes each day in stride and never seems to complain about his lot in life. I can’t ask for much more than that!

For me personally, diabetes has brought an incredible network of friends.  Those friends have encouraged and inspired me to be involved and help to create changes to the world of diabetes in Canada.

It amazes me to look back at how long I have “known” some of these people.  There are the core group of parents that I met on the Children With Diabetes Parents Email list almost 15 years ago.  They have been with me through the good and bad.  They have been there with a hug or a shove in my personal life as well as in our life with diabetes.  The connections made there have been some of the dearest of any I have ever made.  They are truly the very, very best thing to come out of a life with diabetes.

With their encouragement and prodding, I began to look to see what I could do to better improve the lives of people with diabetes.  It led me into two areas–both dealing with fairness.  First there was the issue of fairness in our tax system.

Not long after my son’s diagnosis, I learned of a thing called the Disability Tax Credit.  In reading the description, I knew that my son qualified. In time,  I came to learn that the Canadian Revenue Agency did not always see things the same way that I did.  Some people with diabetes were qualifying, some weren’t.  Some people with diabetes were fighting for this right in court, some weren’t.  I sought to equalize the playing field and make the powers that be understand what was really involved in living with diabetes.

During this process, I met more amazing people.  There were families struggling to get by. There were adults who just wanted to be treated equitably and see some financial relief from the burden of diabetes care costs.  I interacted with many people, some I still hear from and others I see in posts on various social media platforms.  Each one was vital for their support and their belief in what we could do.

Together we did make a difference.  Today, all children under the age of 18 are given the DTC upon receipt of the T2201 from their doctor indicating a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes.  Adults are also eligible for this credit but still must first prove that they are intensively managing their diabetes care and that it takes over 14 hours per week.

When I read posts online about people getting this credit or when  I read others advising their friends to check out my website for tips and information, my heart swells. I know that I have made a difference.

The other thing that I have done because of diabetes that makes me proud is my work with parents and educators in regards to sending children with diabetes to school.  This issue has been something that I have worked on since my son was 3 years old.  He will soon be 18.  The situation is not perfect, but I am happy to say that there have been profound and real changes in how diabetes care is viewed in many Canadian schools.

When I began this journey, the only province to have any sort of legislation or provincial policy in place was New Brunswick.  To date, provinces such as Quebec, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and BC all at least mention the care and treatment of children with diabetes in schools in their provincial education policies.

We still have a long way to go but I no longer receive numerous telephone calls each fall from parents struggling to get help.  I hope that that is a sign that there is more and more support out there for families and students.

Diabetes is a crappy disease. It ruins holidays. It never goes away. Its unpredictable at times and never takes a rest.  It has however brought me a network of friends that have kept me sane throughout the years.  It has allowed me to help in areas that I never would have known about otherwise. For those things, I am truly happy to be able to say that “Diabetes made me do it!”d made me

 

 

Can I get the DTC if I am an adult insulin pumper?

For a number of months there has been concern about a video posted on the CRA website stating that using an insulin pump did not allow a person to be eligible for the Disability Tax Credit.  Many people have written letters to their MP as well as CRA.  The CDA has made the issue of easier qualifications for adults with Type 1 diabetes a priority for the upcoming federal election but what does this really mean to people living with diabetes?  Do they no longer qualify for the DTC if they are using an insulin pump?

A member of the Insulin Pumps.ca staff received the following response from CRA….

In receiving a qualifying therapy, the person must dedicate time to the process. This means taking time away from his or her normal everyday activities to receive the therapy. For portable devices, such as an insulin pump or implanted devices like a pacemaker, the time the device takes to deliver the therapy does not count toward the 14‑hour requirement. Activities like following dietary restriction, exercising, traveling to receive therapy, attending medical appointments, shopping for medication, or recuperating after therapy also do not count toward the 14-hour requirement.

Early on in the fight for fairness regarding the Disability Tax Credit and people living with type 1 diabetes, a court case was won in which it was successfully argued that a person using an insulin pump was actually injecting insulin 24/7 and thus easily spent more than 14 hours per week on life sustaining therapy.  It is not surprising that CRA quickly made an amendment to their policy stating that they would not consider the time a machine/device requires to deliver therapy as part of the 14 hour total.

This does not mean that people who use insulin pumps no longer qualify for the DTC. It means that the time the pump spends delivering insulin does not count towards time spent on therapy. The amount of time dedicated to diabetes related tasks such as bg testing, ketone monitoring, logging, making dosing adjustments, as well as site changes and pump maintenance is still used in the 14 hour calculation of therapy.  The video posted online and the CRA website, unfortunately do not clarify this.  That can be problematic.

Doctors who rely on the CRA website to guide them on what is considered therapy when dealing with Type 1 diabetes may be led to think that insulin pumpers in general do not qualify for the DTC.  Even those living with Type 1 diabetes may wrongly think that they no longer meet the qualifications.

Being an adult with Type 1 diabetes does not automatically qualify someone for the the DTC–being a child under 18 with Type 1 diabetes does.  Using an insulin pump does not automatically qualify you for the DTC–neither does using multiple daily injection therapy. The key to qualification is to intensively manage your diabetes care. This means that you spend over 14 hours per week on such things as testing your bg levels, monitoring for ketones, changing infusion sites, injecting insulin, logging daily diabetes related activities, and other diabetes related tasks that a person without diabetes does not have to do to maintain life.  Tasks such as carb counting does not count towards therapy nor does the amount time spent recovering from a low blood glucose level but many other tasks do and can quickly add up to spending over 14 hours per week on life sustaining therapy. fairness report