Tag Archives: Ginger Vieira

Dealing With Diabetes Burnout….A book review

Ginger Vieira recently released her third book called Dealing with Diabetes Burnout,  How to Recharge and Get Back on Track When You Feel Frustrated and Overwhelmed by Diabetes. I was once again lucky enough to be given a copy of the book to read. As I prepared to write my overview of the book, I  took a glance at how many pages of interest I had marked off. A lot! That means that this was a wonderful book with many excellent points for me to share!

I really wasn’t sure what to expect when I began reading this book.  What would I learn? Would much of it apply to me? Who would this book fit? Well, I learned quite a bit. I gained a new perspective and I can think of quite a few people who this book would help.  Most importantly however, it is a great hands on resource for people who live with diabetes–Type 1 or Type 2.

This book doesn’t just give you a bunch of information and feel good stories.  It is filled with exercises and activities that Ginger challenges you to do to help you deal with your own diabetes burnout.  She doesn’t chastise you for the fact that “I haven’t checked my blood sugar in three weeks (ehh…months)” –a fabulous title of one of the chapters of the book.  Instead she reminds you that you are being asked to manage something that your body is supposed to do on its own based on a variety of other physiological and hormonal processes. (page 21).  She tells  you to look at all of the great things that you are doing and praise yourself for the one thing you are getting right. “developing the ability to step back and see what wasn’t working–rather than blaming yourself–is the trick to creating a new plan that will lead you to your goal.” (Page 33)

This theme is further emphasized by all of the great chapter titles like “I want to be perfect by tomorrow (or I’m giving up!) where Ginger notes that some times are not ideal for change. She suggests that you create your own personalized “pick up plan” to help you refocus in times of stress.

Ginger offers tips on how to handle support from well-meaning people who really don’t get it as well as how to best make use of people who do get it and do want to help.  She shows you how to use technology to make your life a bit easier as well as great real life tips for those of us who would just like to live a healthier lifestyle but find ourselves giving up too soon.

Being a parent of a child with diabetes, as I began to read this book I felt horrible.  I was a failure.  I was the parent who struggled to understand how you could “forget” to do something that you have done all of your life.  Did I push too hard?  Should I have been calmer when his doctor praised him for testing more than once per day and I was looking to see 8-12 readings per day? I was sure that I had totally ruined my son’s childhood.

Thankfully I got some reprieve from my incredible guilt when I moved into the chapter called “Crazy Little Thing Called Love”.  Here Ginger talks about raising a child with diabetes and how truly difficult it is to do. She highlights many of the fears that we have.  The torture we go through when our child is low and disoriented or the failure we feel when they are high and we are positive that we alone are responsible for the kidney damage they may one day have. She offers more wisdom and options to dealing with our children and how to get through to our teens. I was left knowing that I hadn’t scared my child completely…well at least not in that realm.

Nearing the end of the book, I came across one of the very best quotes I have ever read on the issue of diabetes care and one that should be framed and read by everyone dealing with this disease (especially us guilt laden parents)….

“Doing the best any of us can do in life with diabetes does not have to mean perfect blood sugars all the time. Sometimes our best is awesome and sometimes it’s not quite so awesome but it’s still our best in that moment.  And that’s okay.  It has to be, because “perfection” is a crazy expectation.” 

Dealing with Diabetes Burnout is a fabulous resource. If I had one criticism of the book it would be having too many personal stories illustrating various points in the book. Reading through page after page of examples of other people’s burnout was taxing on my incredibly shrinking attention span. That said however, I have no clue as to how I would have cut back on some of the submissions that were used.  They were often very powerful stories that needed to be shared.

Who should read this book? Anyone living with diabetes because as Ginger Vieira notes, at one point you will go through some form of burnout.  To a lesser degree, parents of children of diabetes (no matter what age your “child” may be).  This book will give you insight into the emotions that your child may be dealing with and will also give you a few tips to help you in your own life as well.

diabetes burnout book

The Bad Kind

The other day, I sat down to begin reading Ginger Vieira’s new book “Dealing with Diabetes Burn-out“.  I had only read the introduction when I wanted to cry.  Why is there so much judgement surrounding diabetes? Why do people living with diabetes feel that they are either good or bad? Well, as Ginger points out, its because there is so much good and bad mentioned when talking about the disease.

Your readings are good or bad.  They are not the result of a carb counting error or a pending illness that you cannot foresee. They are a good reading or a bad one.  The food you eat is either good food or its bad and a diabetic shouldn’t eat it.  Your A1c when you see the doctor is either good or bad.

The constant judgement does not end there. I was listening to a conversation a few weeks ago and quietly cringed as I heard someone mention that a person had diabetes “really bad”.  Another person had mentioned that someone had died because they had the “bad kind of diabetes”.  I wanted to say that there is no good kind!  You can only hope and pray that a person with diabetes has all of the knowledge, supports and tools that they need to care for themselves in the best possible way.  It wasn’t my place to educate at that time.

The good kind I assume, is the kind that is managed by diet and exercise  but is it really that good? You still have to live with guilt for each piece of food that enters your mouth.  You must be constantly wondering when that bullet will hit its target and you will get the dreaded sentence–“You have the bad kind of diabetes”.

What is the “bad kind of diabetes”? Is it when you have to have needles? Is it when you are on pills? Is it when you are overweight? Is it when you are two and don’t know why you have to be stabbed and poked at all of the time? Is it when you have to be hooked up to a machine 24/7? When does it become “bad”?

Personally, it is always bad.  In all of those cases, our bodies have rebelled against us and are not working as they should.  We have to fight and struggle to compensate. Using insulin actually can make it easier not worse. Modern insulins allow people with diabetes to be able to match insulin to food amounts in a way that their body, without insulin, can’t.  That’s not such a bad thing. It allows them to have that piece of chocolate cake without concern of a crazy high a few hours later.

This distinction between “good and bad” actually has a negative impact on treatment as well. While insulin injections or insulin pumps are not an option for a person living with Type 1 diabetes, it is often seen as a last resort for a person with Type 2 diabetes.  Sadly this is not the case.  Studies have shown that giving a person with Type 2 diabetes insulin earlier can actually preserve some of their beta cell functioning and make their lives a little easier.  Unfortunately, that “good and bad”  issue stops that from happening. People fear that they will be “bad” if they are on insulin.  This further translates to the thought that  those who live with Type 1 diabetes and need an external source of insulin to keep them alive must have it “really bad”.

I thought about other diseases and wondered if any others have it “bad”.  Cancer has stages.  Diseases like MS are referred to has having “full blown MS” versus the early stages.  I could not think of any other disease that allows people to have the “good kind” or the “bad kind”.  Is it the lifestyle component but if it is why do we not hold that same standard for other “life style” related diseases? Is it because in the other diseases they understand that lifestyle is only a small component? People will say that Type 1 diabetes is NOT a lifestyle related disease but that does not stop the public from blaming the lifestyle of the mother of a person with diabetes.  We are blamed for things like not breastfeeding long enough and other equally ridiculous notions.

What is the answer? How do we fix this? I don’t think that there is a quick fix.  I think that we continue as we have been. We educate people who ask us if we have the “bad kind of diabetes”.  We work with the media when they try to get it right. We are kind but firm with those people who are ignorant of the facts because we may have once been ignorant as well. Finally, we find a cure so that no one ever again has to be judged because their body has failed them.

blame