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Diabetes is an exceptionally costly disease

Its Day 2 of Diabetes Blog week and today we look at the high costs of diabetes care.  Diabetes takes a toll on the person living with the disease, on their relationships and on their wallets. Diabetes is an exceptionally costly disease.

diabetes is costlyFrom the moment the diagnosis comes in, your world begins to shatter.  Quickly you learn that the days of grabbing a snack on the run or leaving the house with just your keys are over.

Diabetes means that your brain must constantly be on.  You must always be thinking about carb counts, blood glucose levels, insulin on board, and a thousand other factors that were previously irrelevant to you.  The mental exhaustion is real.  The toll on the person with diabetes, their caregivers and those around them is significant.

When living with diabetes, it is vital to have supports and to use them! When a friend or partner offers to help, accept it. It doesn’t matter if they do things a little differently.  If no one dies, then it’s a win.  Accept the help.  Take a break. You need it.

Unfortunately it is not just the emotional and physical aspects of diabetes care that can be taxing.  Diabetes is an exceptionally costly disease when it comes to your finances as well.  If you don’t have excellent  insurance coverage, the stresses of life with diabetes are magnified a thousand times over.

For those of us living in Canada, there are a few benefits. First, we don’t have the absolutely ridiculously high insulin costs that our friends to the south are being subjected to.  My son was pleasantly surprised when he was forced to buy his first vial of insulin and it cost him less than $40.

$40 for a person who is in school and working part-time is enough of a cost however.  Thankfully his expense is temporary.  He has two options for coverage. He is trying to get back on his father’s insurance because he is in school.  If that becomes more of a hassle than it is worth, he can still apply for the provincial drug plan to help offset the costs of diabetes supplies.

If you don’t have those options however, diabetes is exceptionally costly.  In February of 2015, I sat down and figured out exactly how costly it would be for me to have Type 1 diabetes and use an insulin pump.   I don’t have private health care coverage, I am too old for the current provincial insulin pump program and I wouldn’t qualify for much of a rebate through our provincial program because of income.

For me to use a sensor augmented insulin pump to maintain my diabetes care, in 2015, I established that it would cost me approximately $14,500 per year.  That is over $1200 per MONTH.  Obviously this total would be drastically reduced if I just wanted to use a syringe and injections.  Either way, I would still require insulin, syringes, test strips, ketone strips, alcohol swabs and glucose tablets to just name a few items to stay alive.

Can you imagine being a young adult and having to save, at minimum, the amount of a car payment just to cover your expenses? What if you wanted to have a family but you have diabetes? You need to be able to afford diapers, clothes, food and diabetes supplies for yourself.  Even those who no longer have children are not immune.  No matter what your age, you carry the need to pay for life-sustaining medical equipment for as long as you live.  That must be exhausting.

There is no cure. There is no end in sight.  All those of us who love people with diabetes can do is continue to offer emotional support.  We can continue to assist with care and those of us in the advocacy realm can continue to ask governments and insurance companies to provide greater help.  Diabetes is an exceptionally costly disease. We must do all we can to help our loved ones deal with it.