Tag Archives: life with diabetes

Diabetes changes your vocabulary

It’s funny how your vocabulary changes when diabetes enters your world.  I saw nothing wrong with sternly telling my 5-year-old son who was having a tantrum in public.. “You had better be high mister!” In hindsight, you do have to wonder how many adults were wondering why I was okay with my child being stoned.

Before diabetes, if someone said that they were low, I would have assumed that they were having a bad day.  I would have offered them a shoulder to lean on…today I am running for glucose!

Twenty years ago, if you had told me to grab a site, I would have thought you meant a campsite and would be questioning why I, of all people, would seriously want a camping site? I prefer camping in a 4 star hotel to sleeping on the ground with bugs and other creatures.

Today when I ask my son to tell me his BS, I don’t want to hear the lies that he has to tell. Gone are the days when BS meant bulls*!@.  Now it reflects important blood glucose information.

A juice box is no longer just something to have on hand when the grandchildren pop over for a visit.  Those little guys are vital, life-saving bottles of sugar to be used when my son comes in from work and says “I’m low”.  He doesn’t want a hug, he just wants that juice!

A Pump is not just for breast milk
A Pump is not just for breast milk

I recently reached out to the diabetes community  and asked what words had new meaning for them when diabetes came into their lives.  The answers were pretty funny! Check these out…

  • A D-bag is no longer a douche bag but rather that super important kit that contains all things diabetes related.
  • Checking your numbers no longer refers to wondering if you have won the lottery.  When diabetes moves in, it is hoping that you win that diabetes lottery and your readings are perfect.
  • As a parent, this was one of the hardest ones for me  to handle…”If you are not hungry then leave your salad and make sure that you finish your dessert!”
  • The question, “How is your 6 year old’s reading?” now sends one parent to automatically check their child’s CGM rather than reply as to what sort of books they are currently able to read.
  • “Make sure you wash all of the blood off of your hands.” has nothing to do with clean up after  a serious accident, applying trauma care or cleaning up a murder scene.
  • A pump isn’t just for breast milk any more!
  • “What’s your number” is not a pick up line.
  • A “Sugar Daddy” does not refer to a man who is supporting a woman in a lavish lifestyle but rather the father of a child with diabetes.

I never realized how much my vocabulary has changed since diabetes came into our lives.  Quite a few of these made me laugh as I realized how odd they must sound to the outside world!

What sort sayings or words have completely changed their meaning for you since diabetes barged into your life?

 

Diabetes Diagnosis day…It slipped my mind

Celebrating 17 years of health and wellness
Celebrating 17 years of health and wellness

It slipped my mind…sort of…well, more so than ever before. Today is the day that Diabetes turns 17 years old in our house.  Strangely, it hasn’t consumed all of my thoughts this month.  I haven’t planned this post for weeks in advance…in fact I actually had another post planned for this week when I realized the date!

That is unheard of for me.

Every March I think of two things…what will I get my oldest son for his birthday and how long diabetes has been a part of my youngest son’s life.

This March has been a bit different.  I was busy this March with other things.  For the first few days of the month, I got to spend time with my nephews after not seeing them for a  few years.  I was able to meet my youngest nephew for the very first time.  We enjoyed cuddles and goofing around.  It wasn’t until I was home that I thought about his little life and the life of his older cousin–my youngest son.

When my son was his age, he was being stabbed with a needle somewhere in his body 5+ times per day.  At the age of 3, his little fingers had tiny marks from testing his blood glucose levels 8 or more times per day.  My sweet little nephew had bruises on his knees from playing outside with his trucks.  When my son was that age, he had similar bruises but there were also bruises that would sometimes find his arms, legs or stomach after an injection.

I am so glad that none of my nephews have had to go through this.  I remain in awe of how well my son has managed to cope.  He won’t even notice this day.  Life with diabetes is all that he has ever known.  For him, it is simply be St. Patrick’s Day–an excuse to go out with his friends and have a beer.

I will pause as I always do.  Most likely I will message a dear friend whose son shares this “dia-versary”.  On this day, I will  be extra grateful for the many incredible and lasting friendships that diabetes has brought into my life.  I will also take a moment to cry for the friend who lost her child last year–we were brought together because of our sons’ common diagnosis of type 1 diabetes.

Today I am sure that I will slip back in time for a moment.  There will be a pause in my day when I vividly recall the lifeless child that I held in my arms 17 years ago.  I will remember the prayers that I said and the prayers that were offered as we rushed to the hospital.  At one point today I will see, in my mind’s eye, the doctor who sent my son to ICU and told me, “if he makes it through the next 24 hours, you will need to learn a lot about diabetes.” The phone calls, the terror, the uncertainty will all come flooding back just like it was yesterday.

Today I will quietly cry for the life that was lost but I then I will wipe away the tears.  As I tell others, today is about celebrating.  Today marks 17 years that my son has lived strongly with type 1 diabetes.  He has never let it stop him from doing anything–except for shovelling the driveway in the winter.  He seemed to often be conveniently low as a child during that particular chore.

My son now manages his diabetes his way. I don’t test him.  Rarely do I know what his blood sugar levels look like.  I can’t tell you his insulin to carbohydrate ratio or even his basal rates. Diabetes is his disease to handle now.

It hasn’t all been perfect. There have been stumbles along the way.  I still remain there to help when asked.  We discuss carb counts or extended boluses.  I still do site changes when required. Seventeen years later, we are both finding our way  but he is healthy and thriving.  I can ask for nothing more…except a cure of course.

 

Tips and Tricks…day 5 of Diabetes Blog Week

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Oh my goodness, today’s prompt is seriously probably the hardest of the week.  Share you best diabetes tips and tricks. Do I have any? We put one foot in front of the other hand hope for the best. Does that count?

Okay, tips and tricks…well, the first trick I learned was when my son was first diagnosed.  We didn’t have Rufus the bear with diabetes but I knew that my toddler needed to feel that he was not alone. The way I did that was to give Elmo diabetes as well.  He had a stuffed Elmo that somehow made its way to the hospital with us.  As I was learning to inject a doll, I have my two year old a needle and supervised him giving Elmo injections.

Writing that sounds crazy. I gave a 2 year old a needle? I did. It was a pen needle and the tip wasn’t in it but I gave him the pen filled with insulin and let him pretend to give his stuffed toy an injection.  He was making his friend feel better just like I was helping to make him feel better.  It worked for us!

As he aged, new issues came up and bribery was introduced.  Okay, we didn’t use the term “bribery”, we referred to it as rewards.  If he ate his breakfast without a fuss, he received a sticker.  After a certain number of stickers a reward was earned.  It worked for a bit.

What tips did we use for storing supplies? Well for us storing diabetes supplies was relatively simple…totes.  We have totes on wheels and when they were too full, we also had totes that went under the bed.  This allowed us to have a large supply of glucometers and pump supplies for times when insurance coverage was not available. My son still has both the cart and the tote.

Finally our rule for travel is simple…always pack twice what you think that you will need and then throw in a little more!  Whenever my son travels, he seems to experience a lot more highs than normal.  We do more site changes.  We bring more supplies.

I have also learned to store insulin in more than one place when you leave home.  We traveled across Canada once many years ago.  All of the insulin was in the cooler.  The cooler was somehow put on the heater setting.  All of the insulin was at risk of being spoiled. I never did that again. Insulin is now scattered among bags for safe keeping.

The final trick we have used is all my son.  When your sites are starting to peel up but the insulin is still flowing, you don’t want to make a change and your readings are still good–use duct tape! We have medical tape.  We have opt-sites.  My son uses duct tape to hold his sites in place.  Yes, they do make a mess of your skin after but they do hold your site in! –You may be a diabetes redneck when??

Mothers Day Reflections

In North America, Mothers Day is this weekend.

I have seen that JDRF Canada is doing promotion this week on #Type1derWoman  This looks really fun and I can’t wait to see more.

A few years ago, the DRI did a segment on the Real Moms of Diabetes.  A few of my friends took part. It was equally as moving.

And of course there is the incredible poem written by my dear friend Linda Kaniasty that mothers in the UK put to video.  It still makes me cry.

All of these posts have me thinking about life as a D-momma.  My role has changed a lot over the past 16 years.

I started out as the mother of a toddler with diabetes.  I was lucky.  He didn’t mind the shots.  He was okay with finger pokes.  He hated to eat however.  That was a challenge.

If I had it to do all over again…and it was 2016 and not 2000, well I would be putting him on a pump right away.  There is no need to fuss with injections, a pump would give us the flexibility to let him eat the way  he wanted.  I would have a CGM so that when he fell asleep, I would know if he was just napping versus having a low and couldn’t tell me.

I would still use bribery.  Stickers and rewards were a fabulous way to get through everything from potty training to meal fights.  I would still allow him to inject and have control of the diabetes care for his toys.  This was a great way to give him power.  I would still worry and log like crazy but that is me.

Eventually my toddler grew and went to school.  The worry again was tangible.  I had friends who would be watching out for him in school but I was terrified.  There was so much that could go wrong.

If I had to do it again, I would have released the terror.  He was left in the care of teachers who truly cared about their students.  He had friends who cared about him.  They all would do their very best…or call me if in doubt.  I didn’t need to hover. I didn’t need to stress–as much.  It was okay.  Yes, there would be wrinkles along the way but they were small. He would survive.  We would all learn. It is important to relax a little during these years as greater challenges will come.

As my child became a preteen, the issues again changed. We struggled to find a balance between what he should be expected to do and what I should be expected to do.  I ached that he was expected to do so much.  I grew frustrated when one of us failed.  If I had to give myself advice for that time looking back it would be that it will be okay.  You will find your way.  If he didn’t die,  learn from it…both of you.  Work hard. He is listening in his own way.  It will be worth it.  He can stumble a bit.  Its okay to wipe his knees but he will get it.

When my son became a teen…well didn’t that change everything!  There were now hormones.  There was the teen brain.  There were struggles.  There were worries.  How do you balance allowing him to be a normal teen (with all of the worries that comes with that stage) and being a teen with diabetes? You ask for help.  You reach out to those who have been there…and you pray.

As a teen, my son decided that he knew it all.  He decided that he really didn’t need the care of Mom any more.  He moved away and decided to finish high school while living with his father. I foresaw many problems.  Some of them came to pass…some didn’t.  I felt like a failure. I was a parent whose child didn’t want to live with them.  People reminded me that it wasn’t about me, this was about him.  It still hurt.  My one clearly defined role now became more blurry than ever.

My son is now a young adult.  He is 18 and learning to live with the choices that he has made.  He has stumbled.  He has tripped a few times but he has done okay. He is getting stronger in more ways than one.  He understands his body he tells me.  He is tightening his control.  He has learned. He knows he can still come to me when he loses his way.

So what would I tell that Mom of a toddler now? You’ve got this.

What would I tell that mom who is watching her son head off to school? The school and his peers have your back.

What would I tell that mom of a teen? He really did listen and learn when you were sure he wasn’t.  Somehow you will both live to go through another stage of parenthood.  Some days will hurt but most days will be a blessing because when you look back at where you have been, where things could have gone? Life is amazing!

There are still challenges.  We still have a long road ahead of us.  No matter how old my children are, I am still their mother.  They are still my children. I worry. I care. I love them deeper than I could have ever imagined.  They make me shake my head at times but they also make me proud.

For all of you fellow D-mommas, take a moment and be proud.  Be proud of YOU and all that you have accomplished when faced with this huge burden.  YOU are amazing!

liam barb sept 1999b

 

 

Dear Diabetes, You are 16 now…

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Dear Diabetes;

You are 16 now.

You are old enough to drive.

You are old enough to date.

You are almost old enough to be finished high school and looking towards a new career.

You are old enough to be looking forward to life on your own.

Unfortunately you don’t have any of those plans.

You are a bum.  You refuse to move on to greener pastures.

You have learned nothing after 16 years.  We have found new treatments to fight you. We have continued to live life to the fullest even when you tried to drag us down.

We have made incredible friends even with you clinging on in the background.

We have continued to live a full life even when you decided to make life horrible by sending blood sugars dangerously high and made my son ill or dropped them low so he had to sit on the sidelines while his friends played.

Diabetes, I have had enough of you.  You no longer wake me up at night. You no longer consume all of my thoughts. You still wake my son however.  Your demands still inconvenience him.  You remain as inconsiderate as ever after all of these years.

I would love nothing more than to kick you out of his life.  I would buy you your own car and send you on your way.  Unfortunately that can’t happen.  You are still with my son after all of these years but guess what? Even when you tried to kill him 16 years ago, he survived! No matter what you have thrown at us, we have survived! It hasn’t been easy.  It has cost us a lot but we are still going.  He has grown to be a strong young man.  I have developed a voice that reaches people in places that I never imagined.

Its been sixteen years since that horrific day when you barged into our lives but we are still strong.  We are still fighting you.  He is still healthy and we are winning. You are still an unwelcome intrusion that we simply tolerate and move forward despite.

 

Not so funny after all

The other day I shared a cute video parody on Facebook done by a young lady who has Type 1 diabetes.  She was singing about being low…and then overtreating and being high.  It was all done in fun. It was cute.  I shared it.

parody jealous

The thing was that while I watched it, I didn’t really think it was funny.  I actually wanted to cry.  My heart broke for her. I didn’t want her to have to feel low. I didn’t want her to have to feel frustrated that she over bolused for that last snack.  I didn’t want her to have to feel happy because she could show people that she could have a chocolate bar if she wanted.  I just wanted her to once again experience life without diabetes.

Perhaps it struck me more because they are all things that I don’t have to worry about.  I can nibble on the chocolate cake that is leftover from the weekend’s birthday celebrations without matching it with insulin. I can sneak a piece of chocolate from the cupboard just because I am having a craving. The only one who will give me a look will be my inner self  telling me that those spare 10 pounds will never go away at that rate!

My son manages his own diabetes care now.  He even makes his own changes.  In a recent conversation, I asked him how his readings were.  He said that he had been having an issue in the mornings but he tweaked his rates and all was fine now. He tweaked his rates on his own. No help from me. No help from an educator. He was steering this disease his way.  It was wonderful and sad.

Like this young woman in the video, he does it all.  There is no respite.  There is no end.  I get to sleep at night now because he isn’t under my roof to check.  Diabetes is always with my son, this young girl and the millions of others who have been diagnosed.   No matter how much I have worked to make life better for them, they still carry the burden. For whatever reason, that hit me hard the other day.  It still does.

I am ready for a cure.

 

 

Diabetes Made me Do it

Its the first day of another Diabetes Blog Week! I am so excited to be a part of this wonderful adventure once again.  As a blogger, it allows me to have topics chosen for me and write about topics that I may not have otherwise thought about.  As a reader, it gives me the chance to see many new blogs that I may not have come across before.  In other words, its a win-win week that I hope you enjoy as much as I do!

Today’s prompt asks me to share  what I have done because of diabetes that has made me the most proud or what good thing has diabetes brought into my life?

Obviously I am proud of the way my son is learning to handle his own diabetes care.  How much of that is up to me and how much is just his personality? We will never know but he takes each day in stride and never seems to complain about his lot in life. I can’t ask for much more than that!

For me personally, diabetes has brought an incredible network of friends.  Those friends have encouraged and inspired me to be involved and help to create changes to the world of diabetes in Canada.

It amazes me to look back at how long I have “known” some of these people.  There are the core group of parents that I met on the Children With Diabetes Parents Email list almost 15 years ago.  They have been with me through the good and bad.  They have been there with a hug or a shove in my personal life as well as in our life with diabetes.  The connections made there have been some of the dearest of any I have ever made.  They are truly the very, very best thing to come out of a life with diabetes.

With their encouragement and prodding, I began to look to see what I could do to better improve the lives of people with diabetes.  It led me into two areas–both dealing with fairness.  First there was the issue of fairness in our tax system.

Not long after my son’s diagnosis, I learned of a thing called the Disability Tax Credit.  In reading the description, I knew that my son qualified. In time,  I came to learn that the Canadian Revenue Agency did not always see things the same way that I did.  Some people with diabetes were qualifying, some weren’t.  Some people with diabetes were fighting for this right in court, some weren’t.  I sought to equalize the playing field and make the powers that be understand what was really involved in living with diabetes.

During this process, I met more amazing people.  There were families struggling to get by. There were adults who just wanted to be treated equitably and see some financial relief from the burden of diabetes care costs.  I interacted with many people, some I still hear from and others I see in posts on various social media platforms.  Each one was vital for their support and their belief in what we could do.

Together we did make a difference.  Today, all children under the age of 18 are given the DTC upon receipt of the T2201 from their doctor indicating a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes.  Adults are also eligible for this credit but still must first prove that they are intensively managing their diabetes care and that it takes over 14 hours per week.

When I read posts online about people getting this credit or when  I read others advising their friends to check out my website for tips and information, my heart swells. I know that I have made a difference.

The other thing that I have done because of diabetes that makes me proud is my work with parents and educators in regards to sending children with diabetes to school.  This issue has been something that I have worked on since my son was 3 years old.  He will soon be 18.  The situation is not perfect, but I am happy to say that there have been profound and real changes in how diabetes care is viewed in many Canadian schools.

When I began this journey, the only province to have any sort of legislation or provincial policy in place was New Brunswick.  To date, provinces such as Quebec, Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and BC all at least mention the care and treatment of children with diabetes in schools in their provincial education policies.

We still have a long way to go but I no longer receive numerous telephone calls each fall from parents struggling to get help.  I hope that that is a sign that there is more and more support out there for families and students.

Diabetes is a crappy disease. It ruins holidays. It never goes away. Its unpredictable at times and never takes a rest.  It has however brought me a network of friends that have kept me sane throughout the years.  It has allowed me to help in areas that I never would have known about otherwise. For those things, I am truly happy to be able to say that “Diabetes made me do it!”d made me

 

 

Dear John and Jane Public

Dear John and Jane Public,

I understand that you probably know very little about diabetes.  Before March 17, 2000 I was just as ignorant.  Not knowing is okay. There are many things that I don’t know about but I am always willing to learn.  I wish that more of you were as well.

If you open your mind and learn, I am hoping that you will also begin to have more empathy and feel less inclined to point blame at the victims.  For some reason, a lot of the general public thinks that it is okay to blame people with diabetes for their condition.  it doesn’t matter if they are 2 or 92, many people feel that if they have diabetes they must have done something to make it happen.

In making that assumption you are hurting people like me, my child and many others who did nothing more than be born with genes that led their bodies to attack themselves.

You would think that after 15 years I would have a tough skin–I do.  I am used to well meaning people passing judgments on food that my child can or cannot eat.  I am used to people telling me that they understand my worries because their grandmother developed diabetes last year at  age 75.  I am used to people saying that my child must have it really bad because he uses an insulin pump.

I have learned to calmly tell those kind health care providers who ask if he will outgrow it that, no, he can’t grow himself a new lung and he won’t grow a functioning pancreas any time soon but thanks for asking!  I have learned to smile when I watch a TV show that suggests that they can track a missing person through the GPS on their insulin pump.  These are silly things that just get filed under “Things you deal with when you live with diabetes”.

John. Jane.  I do have to ask you one thing though.  You see, my skin has thickened. I know that I did not cause my son’s diabetes. He never had chocolate bars or was force fed jube jubes as a tot.  He had breast milk and few processed foods but that was not enough to protect him from developing diabetes.  His body still failed him.  It attacked himself leaving him terribly sick and almost killing him.

My genes may have played a role in this attack.  I have no family history of Type 1 diabetes and very little of Type 2 but I will accept that somewhere in my genetic makeup, there may have been some code that when passed onto his tiny body, created the havoc that led to his diagnosis.

I will accept that my ignorance of illnesses like diabetes and my faith in the medical community delayed my son getting treatment much later than he should have.  I believed the ER doctor who examined him and told me that he just had the flu.  That misdiagnosis almost cost my son his life but I will take the blame for listening to him even for a short while.

As you can see, I don’t need you to add to my guilt with nonsense. There are enough real contributors to keep me feeling horrible but they don’t.  Keeping my son alive and healthy for the past 15 years have been a greater priority.  It has been more important to learn about his disease, get him the best medical treatment, and teach him how to take care of himself than wallow in guilt and blame.

So John and Jane, what I am asking from you is for a bit more understanding.  You don’t have to know what my life has been like. You don’t have to know what my son deals with every minute of every day.  If you would like to learn more, please ask me and I will give you as much information as you want.  What you do can for me however, is to think before you speak.  You can think before you laugh at jokes about people getting diabetes.  You can think before you spread false information.

Please do not use scare tactics and tell your children that if they have one more candy out of the dish that they will get diabetes.  This is no more likely than your eight year old dropping dead of a heart attack because they had one more french fry.  You are right to teach your child the importance of healthy eating.  You are right to tell them how important eating balanced meals and staying active are but don’t make them think that the child in their classroom is responsible for her diabetes because she ate too much candy.  It isn’t fair to your child who may not want to be friends with someone who has such poor willpower,and it is not fair to that student who has enough going on in her body to deal with and could really use the support of friends.

Please Mr. and Mrs. Public, do not tell your friends about people getting diabetes because they are fat, lazy or because their parents didn’t care enough to stop them from eating junk. You may be sitting in a room with a parent whose child has diabetes.  That parent has struggled to make sure that their son or daughter has led a “normal” life while dealing with 3am low blood glucose levels that could kill their child.  That parent may have spent the past week worried about how their son would handle the pressures of graduation ceremonies and after parties while managing their diabetes care on their own.

John and Jane Public, I know that you cannot begin to understand what my life has been like for the past 15 years.  I know that you have no idea as to what my son deals with each day.  I don’t know what its like to deal with  a child with asthma or crohn’s disease but I would never blame the child or the parents for the disease.  I would listen and learn.  I would empathize and offer the little support that I could.

I don’t expect you to learn about diabetes.  I am not asking you to.  I will ignore most of your ignorant comments but if you let me, I will try to educate you a bit as well.  I know too much about diabetes.  I have spent the last 15 years immersed  in its world.  Don’t feel bad for me. I have met some amazing people and I have learned a lot.  My son doesn’t need your pity either. He is quite happy just leading his life but when you see his pump or watch him lance his finger remember…

Yes it hurts but it keeps him alive.

Yes, you could do it if you had to and hopefully you will never have to.

Yes, you should stay away from that junk food and exercise more.  It may or may not stop you from developing diabetes but either way, you will feel better.

Yes, he does have the bad kind of diabetes because there is no good kind.

Yes, its okay to be thankful that you don’t have to experience any of this….I really wish my family didn’t have to either but we do so please, think before you speak, and maybe, just maybe, take the time to learn about this disease that is impacting more and more families every day.

Sincerely;

A  tired mother of a young man with Type 1 diabetes.

Loving created by my dear friend Cheryl D

Loving created by my dear friend Cheryl D

 

What a wonderful community to have to be in!

When my son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes it was one of the darkest times of my life. I was scared. I felt terribly alone. I didn’t know what was happening or how we would cope.  I was overwhelmed and unsure.

I left the hospital terrified that I would  somehow do this wrong. I eventually called a lady whose daughter was diagnosed the month before my son. Her little girl was a bit younger than my son but we had a lot in common.  We lived in different communities however and it would take years before we actually met face to face and become good friends.

In the meantime, I struggled. I stumbled. I am sure I made mistakes. I tried. I cried alone in the dark at night not sure of how I would make it through but grateful that my son was alive and knowing that failing or stopping was not an option. I had a job to do and somehow I would do it.

My son’s diagnosis happened  in the beginning of the  year 2000.  We had survived the Y2K scare only to land in a new nightmare.  We had a computer but this thing called the “internet” was interesting but new to us.  With prodding from my mom that it would make keeping in touch with family easier, I finally broke down and ordered our first dial-up service.

After a bit of playing around, I stumbled across this place simply called “children with diabetes“.  In a few more keystrokes, I was hooked up to a group of strangers who would come to know more about me over time than many of my own family.  They would be there in the dark of night and share the brightest of days.

Over the years we would share our personal lives as well as the highs and lows of diabetes life. We would talk treatment options and share opinions.  We would get together in real life and instantly share hugs, meals and a warmth to be found nowhere else.

For me this was the beginning of my exposure to the Diabetes Online Community.  It was a place where we, as parents, could share and learn.  We moved past the awkwardness of telling the people around us about our “online family” that we have never met in real life.  We knew just how real this online family was and how strong the bond was. We knew that they were there for us no matter what.

Today, this online community has grown.  The advent of Facebook and Twitter has expanded the community.  We have been able to come together with more adults living with Type 1 diabetes and those with Type 2 diabetes.  The bond and the generosity has someone managed to equally grow.

I have seen the Diabetes Online Community (DOC) reach out to help people who have run out of test strips. I have watched as they have helped to raise funds for families who were out of work and just needed a little help to cover their light bill this month.  I have seen money raised to help a family struggling through the loss of the prime income earner due to terminal illness.  I have seen them jump to the aid of members who have lost everything due to fire.  There is no boundaries to the help they will provide and no borders stopping the support.

The support is not always about money. It’s not always about a cyber shoulder to lean on.  The support can also come in technology.  The community has always been a breeding ground for innovation. From the early days of creating a headlight for parents who were doing night tests to the most recent creation of the “Night Scout” for parents who wish to have access to CGM data through cloud technology. It is amazing.

While I am fortunate not to have had a lot of illness in my family, I remain forever grateful to have landed in a community that contains the most generous and true friends that a person could ever ask for.  A place filled with family. Family picture

A Bucket of Gratitude

We all have seen how insanely popular the Ice Bucket Challenge has become.  Stories of how much money ALS has raised since this went viral versus how much money it had raised in previous years are astounding.  What is equally moving is the stories of families touched by ALS.  I dare you to watch any of them without a box of Kleenex.

Last week on the Diabetes Advocacy Facebook page, I shared with you Moira McCarthy’s thoughts on this phenomenon and whether diabetes should be doing something similar. Reading about how ALS had touched her family brought tears to my eyes and I was so glad that my son “only has diabetes”.

I have not watched many of the ice bucket videos.  I have seen a few that have auto-started on my Facebook feed but for the most part I simply have said “I hope that they are donating” and “Better them than me but it is for a good cause.”  There are a few from friends who state that they have a personal connections to ALS that I do make sure that I play.

Maybe that is why I played this next video.    It was from a Facebook Friend who had a child with diabetes who said that ALS had come to call. I was curious.  Would it be her father? Grandmother? I was sure that it would be sad but I had been following the many blessings in their lives. They had recently moved across the country into a dream house. They had enjoyed an amazing summer spent traveling throughout this great country of ours.  Life was very good for them, wasn’t it? After listening to her tell her family’s story, well let’s just say that I was again left very grateful that all my son had to deal with was diabetes.

I know that diabetes kills. I know that diabetes is serious.  I know that things can change in the blink of an eye.  In the past month we have seen depression kill Robin Williams.  We have seen countless stories of how ALS has impacted and destroyed lives.  I have seen a family devastated when a father tried to save his drowning daughter only to be killed instead. Life and death happen. We deal with the cards that we are dealt but some of us have greater challenges to face than others.

In a blink of an eye it could be worse–so much worse. Diabetes can be cruel but life with diabetes is getting better. Highs are still brutal in their destruction of the body.  Lows are still deadly especially when they happen at night or when a person with diabetes is alone. There is hope however. Technology has created major changes.

We have the bionic and artificial pancreas projects.  We have CGMs, rapid insulin, and smart pumps.  We have apps to count carbs and apps to get us out of trouble.  We have a wonderful community of people living with diabetes who get it and support us every day.  Diabetes sucks but after seeing what others live with…well I will take diabetes with a bucket of gratitude.

gratitude bucket